Paul Robeson High School for Human Services 9-12

Principal
Hiromi Hernandez

4125 Ludlow Street
Philadelphia PA 19104
Phone: 215-823-8207

Building a Community of Excellence!

Action Plan 2011

Action Plan 2011

 

 

 

The School District of Philadelphia

 

 

 

 

 

Action Plan

 

 

for

 

 

Student Achievement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School:  Robeson High School for Human Services

Principal:  Mrs. Hiromi Hernandez

Address:  4125 Ludlow Street, Philadelphia, PA  19104

Phone:  215-823-8207

Fax:  215-823-8252

Email:   hhernandez@philasd.org

Assistant Superintendent:  Linda Cliatt-Wayman

Address:  3133 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, PA  19121 (L.P. Hill School Bldg.)

Phone: 215-684-5120

Fax:  215-823-5258

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PURPOSE OF THIS ACTION PLAN

 

This SDP action plan provides a single, comprehensive school plan to improve the academic performance of students.  Its use requires collection and analysis of student performance data, setting priorities for program improvements, rigorous use of effective solution strategies, and ongoing monitoring of results.  The template provides a structured means to improve teaching and learning to meet state content and performance standards. To accomplish this purpose, the template includes elements found by educational research and professional practice to be essential to the success of plans to improve student’s academic performance.  In addition, if all applicable portions of the template are properly completed, school plan content requirements will be met for all programs and will meet the needs of all students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANALYSIS OF CURRENT EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE

The following statements characterize educational practices at the school site:

 

. Alignment of curriculum, instruction and materials to content and performance standards:

The SDP Core Curriculum is followed in all content areas, with all teachers adhering to the School District’s Planning and Scheduling Timeline. Lesson Plans are monitored weekly for daily evidence of content standards in lessons. The principal conducts formal and informal observations to ensure that the curriculum, instruction and materials are aligned to content and performance standards. Departmental meetings are held weekly during common planning time meetings to monitor student achievement and ongoing alignment with the standards.

            Content area instruction is aligned to the IEP through the SDP Core Curriculum.   Standards-based IEPs are developed using core curriculum materials. The content areas are aligned in the individualized educational plans of students with disabilities by relating assessment data to the standards; this includes anchors of the Standard Aligned System Curriculum Framework.  This allows the IEP team to write standards aligned to measurable annual goals. 

 

 

2. Availability of standards-based instructional materials appropriate to all student groups:

            Each teacher received a copy of Access to the Core Curriculum Strategies Guide to support the individual needs of all students, including those in regular education and those  receiving special education services.  Title 1 funds have been used to purchase the books and supplies to supplement core materials.  Carnegie Learning, Student Edge for SAT Math, and Achieve 3000 were used for enrichment and interventions in math and reading.  All students have access to grade-level and ability-appropriate instructional material through the programs and materials listed above.  Teachers’ lesson plans reflect daily use of adopted instructional materials and supplemental materials.  Year-end inventory of these materials is conducted by staff.  Site policy holds teachers accountable for materials and core resources.

The SaS Consideration Toolkit, is used to provide a systematic approach to structure the process that the supplemental aids and materials are used to assure the implementation of standards aligned IEP/GIEPs in categories like: collaborative, instructional, physical, social-behavioral.  Utilization of tutors or adult tutors, modifications to the classroom curriculum, instructional adaptations, and collaboration/consultation among staff, parents, and other professional training for staff, student, and/or parents, specific seating arrangements, word processing, and research based supplementary materials.

 

 

3. Alignment of staff development to standards, assessed student performance and professional needs:

            Professional development has focused on developing reading comprehension skill in the areas of inferencing skills and drawing conclusions in non-fiction reading.  Professional development occurs weekly in grade group and common planning times.  The staff received training in Achieve 3000 reading program and the Carnegie Learning math program. We have intergrated the Access to the Core Strategies Guide into each professional development in order to give teachers skills in linking the IEP to the core curriculum. The SEL facilitated turn-around training to the Math Department teachers, in particular, using the Access to the Core.

Additional professional development is offered to address non-instructional concerns.  This year we had professional development on CSAP, including the pilot CSAP on the Schoolnet system, as well as creating a school-wide positive behavior supports program.

Much of the teacher professional development take place in the school itself and is targeted to a teacher's specific needs, such as the disability or writing skills.

 

4. Service provided by the regular program to enable underperforming students to meet standards:

Teachers identify underachieving students in their classes and develop long-range intervention plans with the support of the department chairs, counselor and the Leadership Team.  Inclusion teachers and paraprofessionals work to ensure that Special Education students have developmentally appropriate access to the core curriculum.  Intervention supports include differentiated instruction, pull-out and push-in services, extended learning time, etc.  Teachers develop long-range intervention strategies to support all and under-performing students.  Para-professionals, special education staff and community organizations assist in providing additional individualized instructional support.

Our interventions include but are not limited to:  Extended Day, Saturday School, Corrective Reading/Math.  Our school implemented differentiated instruction in reading/math skills through the use of Achieve 3000 strategies and Carnegie Learning.  These interventions are provided during regular school hours, as well as before and after the regular school day.  These interventions are identified through the detailed analysis of the academic data provided through PSSA, Benchmark, and Predictive assessments.

 Each teacher received the Access to the Core Curriculum Strategies Guide to address the needs of Special Education students and all students.  Dry-Erase boards were purchased for facilitating in checking for understanding for individual students.

Modifications and accommodations are made to the content and performance expectations or educational environment for students so that the student with an IEP/GEP can access the general education curriculum.  They may include but not be limited to:  modifications to the classroom curriculum, read exam orally, open book exams, more time allowed to complete assignments or exams, shortened assignments, large print materials, word processing device, preferential seating, frequent reminder of rules, use of calculator, and magnification devices.

 

5. Service provided by categorical funds to enable underperforming students to meet standards:

            Operating and categorical funds are used to purchase teachers and supplies that support appropriate educational initiatives.

            Title 1 funds were used to purchase supplemental reading and mathematics materials to support all and under-performing students.  Students are offered a variety of supports including Supplemental Education Services and extended day.  Personnel include SSA’s as well as a supplemental teacher.   Title 1 funds are used to supplement professional development and to purchase technology, software and computer programs that address differentiation.

            IDIEA (ACCESS) money provides additional resources to support our IEP students.  These materials provide our special education students a free and appropriate, least restrictive education.  Students are provided with supplemental education services. 

 

 

6. Use of state and local assessment results to modify instruction and improve student achievement:

Throughout the school year our staff meets to analyze and disaggregate student performance data in order to identify trends in reading and math and to identify targeted student populations, including IEP students.

PSSA data indicate that our school made AYP, but we are in School Improvement 1.  The PSSA data, along with benchmark data indicated the continuing areas of need:  reading comprehension and academic literacy development; math needs include algebraic equations and math computation skills.

Teachers are required to review and document their use of student Benchmark and Predictive assessment results and report card grades, as well as student work.  These data sources inform planning and delivery of instruction and decisions are made about which skills to re-teach and focus on. 

 

7. Family, school, district and community resources available to assist underperforming students:

            In September 2010, the Leadership Team began participation in the School District’s pilot CSAP program on Schoolnet, the District’s information management system.  The team received training and conducted turn-around training on Schoolnet’ s CSAP.  CSAP meetings occur weekly with parents, students and teachers included.  Truancy letters are sent to parents inviting them to meet with the administration and school Attendance Team. During these meetings, goals are set and monitored by the Attendance Team.

            Partnerships with local universities and community organizations provide additional resources for students and families that need additional supports.           

            The Home and School association fundraises to support enrichment programs that enhance the education of all students.  The Home and School Association fosters and improves the relationship between the school and community.

To assist underperforming students, a monthly calendar of meetings inviting parents with their child along with leadership and staff, a meeting is convened to discuss data to develop a plan to support the underperforming students experiencing difficulties to learning.  The plans are reviewed every weekly, monthly and quarterly through a case management system.

 

8. School, district and community barriers to improvements in student achievement:

            As a city-wide admissions high school, our students come from all over the city.  This often means that students take two to three modes of public transportation to reach our school.  Unfortunately, this translates into a high level of chronic tardiness on the part of our students.  

The chronic tardiness rate was alarming. The chronic lateness rate is over 60% of Robeson students with 10 or more lateness.  Moreover, limitation of student access to technology has been a concern.  The school has two computer labs, with 25 computers in each.  This is not enough to service the entire student body of 300+ students.  Although teachers schedule classes using a central master calendar, computer lab accessibility remains a challenge.

These are barriers to improving student success.  The lack of success of students with disabilities on standardized tests and local assessments was indicated by the data: 100% of students with disabilities were below basic in math on the PSSA last year and 83% of 11th graders with IEPs were below basic in reading.

Close monitoring of student lateness continues by the Attendance Team, with parents included in CSAP meetings.  Ongoing professional development continues in the area of best practices to meet the needs of all students, with a focus on inclusive practices. 

            The lack of success of students with disabilities on standardized tests and local assessments was indicated by the data: 100% of students with disabilities were below basic in math on the PSSA last year and 83% of 11th graders with IEP’s were below basic in reading.  

However, for two consecutive years, students participating in Corrective Reading have tested out of the program and made a two-year level gain.  In Corrective Mathematics, students have moved to the next level skill set.

 

9. Limitations of the current program to enable underperforming students to meet standards:

            Students with IEPs have not had a high success rate in the core content areas of math, English, social studies and science in inclusion classes.  In addition to Corrective Reading/Math, students have access to Achieve 3000 and Carnegie Learning.  Our CSAP team and Attendance team provide additional services comprehensive services to all and underperforming student groups.

             Currently every teacher has access to the appropriate Core Curriculum materials available to them along with a copy of the Core Strategies Guide to help them reach underperforming students by adapting the Core Curriculum effectively.  All teachers receive professional development and ongoing support of the department chairs to implement best practices. 

            Our regular education and special education teachers have common planning time together, where they can work collaboratively on lesson plans and differentiating instruction.  This has been a great resource for our teachers to work collaboratively in helping to improve achievement.  The Access to the Core Strategies Guide has guided our professional development.  However, we now need to shift our focus to meeting individual students’ IEP goals and effectively differentiating instruction and by implementing co-teaching effectively in the classrooms.  Teachers receive ongoing professional development from the SEL to address the

instructional/classroom management challenges in working with IEP students along with underperforming general education students.

 

10. Analysis of current staff and material resources and how they are being used in relation to improving student achievement at the school.

Regular education and special education teachers have a common planning time to discuss, develop, and review lesson plans and differentiating instruction.  Supplemental materials have been purchased through Title I to support students with IEP/GIEP’s.

The Special Education teachers are stretched thin to be in every content-area class to support students and this has impacted achievement.  Additional on-site professional development, a technology program that is literacy and math-based, and supplementary materials are required. There is a need for the regular education teachers to attend ongoing professional development in the area of co-teaching with the Special Education teachers.  This will greatly enhance our ability to support IEP student and underperforming students in content area classes.

            The Core Curriculum textbooks are available online at both StudentNet and on our school website.  Numerous supplemental materials have been purchased through Title 1 funds to help support the Core Curriculum.           

We have a strong commitment to technology in the building and our teachers have access to up-to-date equipment and software programs, in-house professional development and support, and a centralized server system that allows students to access their work from anywhere in the building, contributing to extended learning time. 

            We also have a strong commitment to focusing on the vision of our school:  human services.  Our name reflects the mission and vision of this special admission school.  Parents and students choose to come here based on the human services specialty.  Currently, we offer a health related curriculum through the Career Technical Education School District (CTE) program.  CTE centralized budget provides one full-time teacher for this program. We have a strong partnership with the Penn Medicine Pipeline that offers selected students year-round internships in the medical and human services field at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) as well as dual enrollment courses at the Community College of Philadelphia.  In September of 2011, for the first time, we will offer elective courses and opportunities at each grade level that align and support our mission of schooling in the human services field.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please insert your PSSA Data Sheet

 

 

Provided by the Office of Accountability

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATA CONCLUSIONS

Conclusion from Student Performance Trend Data:

 

                        SWP # 1a. Provide a description of the comprehensive needs assessment that was conducted to develop the schoolwide plan.

 

Paul Robeson High School for Human Services is 98% African American, with the remaining percentage consisting of Latino students. White students are not represented at the school. The African American population is the same as the entire school population.  12% of our students are students with IEPs.

The Leadership Team reviewed multiple data points on student performance, which included the 2010 PSSA data and the four-year trend data, Benchmark test scores, predictive test scores in English and math, Corrective math and reading assessment results, Achieve 3000 data, Carnegie Learning data, interim report card grades, parent, student and teacher annual surveys, attendance and school climate trends, CSAP data, graduation rate, suspension and serious incidents, and formal and informal observations.

 

 

 

SWP # 1c. Indicate the data used to develop the needs assessment, including the problems that led to identification for improvement.

 

PSSA Data

 

The 2009-2010 AYP Status:  We made AYP through Safe Harbor. 

We met 13 of the 13 targets.

We met our Graduation Target at 94.12%.

Math (Whole School)

The Overall Student group made an increase of 9 points.

The Overall Student group was below the target by 17.5 points.

 

Math (Student Group)

No relevant student group met the 56% target outright.

 

The Black/African American student group is shoeing a positive three-year trend: 

SY07-08 to SY 08-09, the percentage for the Black/African American student group went

from 23.8% to 24.3%.

SY08-09 to SY09-10, the percentage for the Black/African American student group went from

30.3% to 39.1%. 

 

The Economically Disadvantaged student group is showing a positive three-year trend:

SY07-08 to SY08-09, the percentage for the ED student group went from 23.8% to 24.3%.

SY08-09 to SY09-10, the percentage for the ED student group went from 29.5% to 37.5%.

 

Math (Achievement Gap)

Each relevant student group closed the gap in proficiency between itself and higher performing

relevant student groups in Math, according to the School District 2010 Performance Index data. 

However, our 2011 mid-year targets were missed by 4.4 points.

 

 

 

Math Concerns:

While the school met AYP through Safe Harbor, the school continues to b e below the target of

56% proficiency.  No relevant student group met the target of 56%, although a positive trend

exists.  Therefore, this school has a school-wide concern in mathematics.

 

Overall school strengths and concerns in Math:

·  The achievement gap is narrowing between the All student group and the Black/African

American and the Economically Disadvantaged student groups.  Each of the subgroups made AYP through the provision of Safe Harbor.

·  The Black/African American 2011 mid-year targets were not met, with a gap of 4.4%.

 

Reading (Whole School)

The Overall Student group was below the target by 14.5 points.

The Overall Student group met performance targets through the provision of Safe Harbor, with a

26.7 point gain in reading.

 

Reading (Student Group)

No relevant student group met the target of 63%.

 

The Black/African American student group more than doubled the reading scores in SY09-10,

going from 22.4% to 49.2%. However, the previous year (SY08-09) showed a drop in scores that

went from 38.6% to 22.4%. 

 

The Economically Disadvantaged student group showed a strong gain in SY09-10, going from

21.8% to 47.7%.  Previously, the scores in SY08-09 dropped from 38.0% to 21.8%.

 

Reading Achievement Gap

Each relevant student group is the same as our Overall student group and performed the same.

The positive data is that the data on the 2010 School District Performance Index shows the

Achievement Gap as narrowing from 43.15 to 19.4%.  However, the 2011 mid-year performance

target was missed by 1.5%.

 

Reading Concerns:

While the school met the AYP through Safe Harbor, the school continues to be below the target

of 63% proficiency.

No relevant student group met the target of 63%, although scores more than doubled this year.

We missed our mid-year target by 2 points; the achievement gap increased by 1.5 points.

Therefore, the school has a school-wide concern in reading.

 

Overall school strengths and concerns in Reading:

The reading scores more than doubled for the All student and relevant student groups (African

American and ED student groups.

The achievement gap has decreased between our Overall and relevant student groups, which are

basically the same group.

We are still 14.5 % below the target of 63%.

 

Predictive Data

 

Math

According to our Predictive 2 Math results, 39.1% of our students scored proficient or advanced

in Mathematics.

The African American student group scored 39.5% proficient or advanced.

MATH  Predictive 2 Findings:

Grade Level

Strength

Area of Concern

Grade 9

M11.A.2.1.1 – 71 %

 Solve problems using operations with rational numbers including rates and percents (single and multi-step and multiple procedure operations) (e.g., distance, work and mixture problems.

M11.D.2.1.2 – 8 %

Identify or graph functions, linear equations or linear inequalities on a coordinate plane.

M11.D.2.1.4 – 12 %

Write and/or solve systems of equations using graphing, substitution and/or elimination (limit systems to 2 equations).

Grade 10

M11.D.1.1.1 – 91 %

 Analyze a set of data for the existence of a pattern and represent the pattern algebraically & graphically.

M11.D.2.1.2 – 16 %

Identify or graph functions, linear equations or linear inequalities on a coordinate plane.

M11.D.3.2.3 – 16%

Compute the slope and/or y-intercept represented by a linear equation or graph

Grade 11

M11.C.1.4.1 – 82 %

 Find the measure of a side of a right triangle using the Pythagorean Theorem (Pythagorean Theorem included on the reference sheet).

M11.C.1.1.2 – 15 %

Identify and/or use the properties of arcs, semicircles, inscribed angles and/or central angles.

M11.A.2.2.2 – 20 %

Simplify/evaluate expressions involving multiplying with exponents (e.g. x to the 6th power * x to the 7th power = x to the 13th power), powers of powers (e.g., (x to the 6th power) to the 7th power=x to the 42nd power) and powers of products (2x²)³=8x to the 6th power (positive  only).

 

 

Math Concerns:

While we made AYP in math also, the 38.5% score is still below the target of 56% in mathematics.

The 2010 PSSA data and the school district’s math predictive testing data indicated needs in the areas of:

Algebraic concepts (MA.111.M11.D) – 45.5%

Analysis and Probability – (Ma.11.M11.E) – 56.48%

Geometry skills (MA.11.M11.C) – 52.78%

             

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading

·  According to the ELA Predictive 2 results, our 11th grade students scored 50.6 proficient or advanced. 

·  10th grade students scored 49% proficiency.

·  9th Grade students scored 57% proficiency, scoring the highest on the most recent predictive.

 

English Benchmark (1/31/2011) and Predictive Data (1/6/2011):

Grade

Strength

Area of Concern

Grade 9

Benchmark

R11.A.1.6.1 – 92.1%

Author’s intended purpose of text

 

Predictive

R11.A.2.4.1 – 85.7%

Implied main ideas and relevant supporting details from text

Benchmark

R11.B.1.1.1.c.2 – 26.6%

Plot

 

 

Predictive

R11.A.2.6.2 – 17.1%

Examples of author’s intended purpose

Grade 10

R11.A.2.4.1 – 88.4%

Implied main ideas and relevant supporting details from text

 

Predictive

R11.B.2.2.1 – 89.9%

Point of view

Benchmark

R11.A.2.6.2 – 15.9%

Examples of author’s intended purpose

 

Predictive

R11.A.1.6.1 – 26.1%

Author’s intended purpose of text

Grade 11

R11.B.3.1.1 – 85.5%

Use of facts and opinions to make a point or construct an argument in nonfiction text

 

Predictive

R11.A.1.6.2 – 87.3%

Make inferences and/or draw conclusions

Benchmark

R11.B.1.1.1.d – 25.5%

Theme

 

 

Predictive

R11.B.1.1.1.d – 25.5%

Theme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SIP # 3. Address the academic achievement problems that caused the schools to be identified for School Improvement. (NA if school is not in any level of improvement

Reading:

In 2009, PSSA reading scores fell by 17 points.  In 2010, the PSSA reading scores increased by 27 points, going from 21.8% to 48.5% proficiency. 

Below Basic students decreased by 10 percentage points, from 37.2% to 27.3%.

Black student group increased in proficiency from 21.8% to 49.2%.

The Economically Disadvantaged student group increased in proficiency from 21.8% to      47.7%.

 

Math:

In 2010, we made AYP in math through Safe Harbor.  The 2010 Math PSSA scores increased from 29.5% to 38.5% proficient and above. 

             Overall student group:  38.5%, a gain of 9 points

             For our Black/African American, non-Hispanic group: 39.1%, a gain of 8.8 points.

             Economically Disadvantaged: 37.5%, a gain of 8 points.

      

Students scoring Below Basic decreased 9.3% from 46.2% to 36.9%. 

Economically Disadvantaged students scoring below basic decreased from 46.2% to 37.5%, while this group increased in proficiency from 29.5% to 37.5%.

 

Non-Academic Data

 

Climate and Data Conclusions:

The AYP Data Table shows that we met our Graduation target at 94.12%.

Our on-track-to graduate students increased from 65.8% to 68.3%, by mid-year review data. 

   ·We will continue with student Individualized Learning Plans (ILPs) to ensure that we

    meet the target of 69.2% by June 2011.

 

The percentage of students dropping out increased from 3.1% to 3.3%.

   ·The CSAP Team and the Attendance team, along with the counselor, are monitoring

    struggling students and their intervention plans to prevent students dropping out of school.

 

Student daily attendance rate has increased from 89.3% to 91.9% by mid-year (February 2011 review data.

Teacher attendance rates have increased from 95.1% to97.5%.

The chronic absenteeism rate (students with 10 or more unexcused absences) has been drastically reduced this year, from 46.9% during the 2009-10 to 12.8% this year, according to the mid-year (February 2011) data.

 

CSAP Rating:  2010 - 82.5% - We did not meet our 2011 mid-year target.

 

   ·As a pilot CSAP on Schoolnet, the data is inconclusive.  We are in the process of addressing 

    computer glitches in the pilot data entry process and will have more conclusive data from the

    District in the future.*  We continue to schedule weekly CSAP Tier 2 meetings with parents

    and students and to closely monitor the improvement goals set at these meetings for students.

 

Suspension Data Conclusions:

Grade 10 has the highest number of suspensions.

Juniors and seniors have the highest number of class cuts, most occurring after the lunch periods.

Chronic Lateness:

This is a serious issue at our school.  The chronic lateness rate is more than 60% of our students have 10 or more latenesses to school.

·The teachers conduct after-school detentions for chronic lateness and cutting classes.  The Climate Team also conduct afternoon detentions for tardy and truant students.  The Attendance team and the principal meet with students and parents who are chronically late and/or tardy.

 

Suspensions for 2010 – 11, as of January 31, 2011 are:

Grade 9 –     7 suspensions

Grade 10 –  13 suspensions

Grade 11 –  13 suspensions

Grade 12 –   8 suspensions

Total  = 41

 

Serious Incidents:  We had 4 serious incidents for the 2009-2010 school year.  To date, for the 2010-2011 school year, we have had 10 serious incidents. 

·6 of the ten are for classroom disruption/disorderly conduct; 2 are for verbal threats; 2 are for fights/assaults.

 

·We have instituted a positive behavior support program that includes “key kids” for good behavior.  The Daily Announcements include a positive behavior and decision-making component through the Project Wisdom program.

·We revised our Progressive Discipline Policy in January and implemented after-school detentions in February. 

·The reductions in chronic absenteeism can directly be attributed to the constant monitoring through CSAP, enhanced outreach to parents, and the teamwork among the Climate Team, Attendance Team, the Leadership Team and all teachers. 

 

·We targeted the tenth grade class for specific positive behavior supports such as:  electing class officers who meet monthly with the administration and leadership team to discuss and plan for improvement in behaviors; offering incentives for improvement; planning a Sophomore Class Night; a sophomore advisory program.

 

 

 

 

Conclusions from Parent, Teacher, Student Surveys, Home- School Association and community meetings:

 

SWP # 1d. Provide a detailed description of student/teacher/parent needs.

 

All school families were provided with a parent survey instrument, sent by the Office of Accountability. The Parent, Teacher and Student surveys were completed in Spring 2010.  Despite school advertising through ParentLink Autodialer and flyers, only a small number of parents responded. 

The needs are:

 

Parent surveys, with and overall score of B-, indicated a need for improvement in:

-satisfaction in the quality of education their child is receiving – 79%

-the school’s expectations in academics and behavior – 72%

-parental involvement in their child’s school – 49%

-school supportive environment and safety – 74%

 

Parents indicate that the school needs to improve in the climate and safety issues and in student behavior issues. 

 

Teacher surveys indicated a need for improvement in the areas of:

-teacher communication with parents on a regular basis – 43%

-parental involvement in academic programs – 37%

 

Teachers stated priorities in the area of student study skills and active collaboration with parents.  This will help to improve student achievement and an improved school climate.

 

Student surveys indicated a need for improvement in the areas of:

-challenging coursework – 60%

-sufficient technological resources in classes – 49%

-studying for tests – 40%

Students indicate a need to improve in study skills and in integrating rigorous course work

Students are dissatisfied with the lack of access to technology.

 

As discussed by staff and parents alike at community meetings, there is a recognized need to expand the level of parental involvement in school and in active communication with teachers through increased parent outreach efforts, parent workshops and events targeted for our parents of underperforming students, and for the parents of Special Education students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCHOOL’S OBJECTIVES BASED ON ANALYSIS OF DATA

 

                  In each of the following areas, schools are expected to write two to four measureable objectives that will drive their academic program for the following school year.  The first objective (s) should address their overall population of students.  The second objective (s) should address the school’s under-performing and/or under-represented student groups.  In Section C, the school must address how these new objectives are different than previous years and will enable a school to achieve dramatic improvements in performance.  All goals must be measurable, attainable, and monitored on a regular basis (i.e. SMART goals)

1. Academic Achievement: What are the school’s plans to improve academic achievement for all students in reading and math?  How will the school address the achievement gap between all students and the under-performing groups?  All goals must be measurable, attainable and monitored to ensure appropriate implementation.

 

A.    All students – Our school plans to improve academic achievement for students include but are not limited to:  providing standards-based curriculum and implementing the Core with fidelity.

 

·       By June 2011, 60% of all students will achieve proficiency in reading.

 

·       By June 2011, 50% of all students will achieve proficiency in math, as measured by the 2011 PSSA scores.

 

·       By June, there will be at least a 17% increase in the percentage of students scoring proficient or advanced on the PSSA in reading.

 

·       By June, there will be at least a 10% increase in the percentage of students scoring proficient or advanced on the PSSA in Math.

 

B.    Under-performing and/or under-represented student groups – We plan to improve academic achievement for the under-performing and/or under-represented students by:  differentiating instruction and integrating Eligible Content into daily instruction.  We will address the achievement gap between all students and under-performing students by continuing targeted interventions to all students as well as under-performing students.  Teachers will receive ongoing supports with the implementation of Achieve 3000 and Carnegie Learning as well as the Student Edge program.

 

·       By June 2011, 60% of African American students will be proficient in reading.

 

·       By June 2011, 50% of African American students will be proficient in Math.

 

·       By June 2011, 60 % of Economically Disadvantaged students will achieve proficiency in reading.

 

·       By June 2011, 50% of Economically Disadvantaged students will achieve proficiency in Math.

A plan for closing the achievement gap for students with IEPs who are receiving continuum of special educations services consists of the use of progress monitoring.  All students receiving special educations services are rostered to one class or a “double dose” of scientific research based interventions to remediate deficient skills.  Although all of our teachers are highly qualified in their content areas, teachers will be closely utilizing adapted materials effectively differentiating and meeting individual student IEP goals.  The specific goals for itinerant and supplemental service group students are to increase self-advocacy skills, increase reading levels by two years, self monitor their progress and to increase level of achievement through report card grades, with increase attendance in after school and summer enrichment programming.

 

C. How is this different from the past/previous practice?

    The major difference in literacy and math is the offering of interventions as elective courses in English and Math.  Special Education students are included in these elective classes.

SWP # 2. Describe the reform activities that provide opportunities for all children to meet the proficient and advanced levels of student achievement. (B)(i)

 

Literacy reform initiatives:  All students in grades nine – eleven have been rostered to a literacy lab based on PSSA data, daily, using the Achieve 3000 and Carnegie Learning programs to improve reading skills. These programs provide differentiated and individualized skills practice in literacy skills.  The teachers and leadership team monitor student progress weekly.

Math reform initiatives:  Students use the math lab once a week for Carnegie Learning. Identified ninth grade students are rostered into an intervention class in the lab, using the Carnegie Learning individualized program in addition to their regular math class. These programs use a progress-monitoring component.

 

SIP # 5. Adopt policies and practices concerning the school’s core academic subjects that ensures that all groups of students will meet the State’s proficient level of achievement. (NA if school is not in any level of improvement.)

The administration monitors lesson plans weekly to ensure that instruction is standards-based and structured for mastery learning.

Daily common planning time meetings are devoted to review of student work samples, Benchmark test results, and planning for interventions for student groups based on data from

formative assessments and Benchmarks. The Department Chairs of each content area monitor the progress of all students through the monthly review of student work samples in the Student Folders from each class. The administration meets weekly with each Department to review the trends of student progress so that instruction for adjustment of instruction. The Department Chairs and administration ensure the integration of eligible content and rigor in lessons by the alignment of Do Nows, mastery objectives and the cycle of effective instruction through informal and formal classroom observations and review of lesson plans. Immediate feedback is provided to teachers, using the informal observation forms.

 

 

 

SWP # 11. Describe how teachers will be included in the decisions made regarding the use of academic assessments. Describe how teachers will use these assessments to provide information and to improve the achievement of individual students and the overall instruction program. (H)

 

Teachers review Benchmark test results and trends in their departments. Each department plan for interventions for identified students.  Department chairs provide a monthly report on achievement trends of students.  Report card grades are reviewed quarterly by the leadership team for trends and targeted skills interventions. 

Teachers complete the High School Worksheet for struggling students and students with IEPs to monitor progress and implementation of early intervention.

 

 

 

2. Academic Equity: What are the school’s plans to involve all students and increase the involvement of under-represented and/or under-performing groups in a comprehensive education by providing access to and involvement in a high-quality program of studies in the Core Curriculum?

 

A.  All – All teachers will use the Core Curriculum along with the related Access to the Core Curriculum Strategies Guide to plan and implement high quality instruction in the content areas.  Lesson plans will be monitored by the Principal weekly to ensure adherence to rigorous instruction.

 

B.  Under-performing and/or under-represented student groups – 100% of our Special Education students will have IEP goals that are aligned to the content standards with grade appropriate objectives to assure that they are being exposed to the same content and standards as their general education peers.  IEP goals will be monitored by the SEL and the Principal quarterly.

 

·       By June 2011, 85 % of African American and Economically Disadvantaged students will pass math courses.

·       By June 2011, 90% of African American and Economically Disadvantaged students will pass English.

 

The general and special education staff has shared responsibility because they are both educators of the students.  The special educator is part of the instructional or planning teams.  The general educator is the expert of the content.  With this teaming approach problem solving and program implementation can be a success.  Regular teachers, special education teachers, and other specialists collaborate.

 

C.  How is this different from the past/previous practice?

Prior to this year, teachers did not have access to web-based programs of Achieve 3000 and Carnegie Learning.  All students will have access to the math lab and the literacy once a week.  An after-school lab will be open to students during the week to support students in the core content areas.

 

SWP # 3. Describe the specific methods and instructional strategies based on scientifically based research that will be used to strengthen the core academic program in the school. Improve the teaching of reading/language arts, mathematics, and, at least by the 2005-2006 school year, science, consistent with the State standards. (B)(ii)(II)

The specific instructional strategies that are used this year by all teachers are:  the implementation of the cycle of effective instruction, with emphasis on Mastery Objectives,

criteria for success, explicit instruction, guided practice, checking for understanding, summary of lesson.

To improve the teaching of reading, all content area classes integrate literacy in the content areas through the reading strategies of clarification, summarization, and how to read a

textbook strategies.  Eligible content is integrated into daily lessons with a monthly reading skills focus in all content areas. The skills that are addressed are determined by data: reading comprehension skills of fiction and non-fiction, inferencing and drawing conclusions, interpretation of mood, tone and style of the author, and analysis of text organization, non-fiction

text skills. Student work is monitored through the review of student work samples and Benchmark and predictive test results.

Math teaching methods and strategies focus on the use of the problem-solving protocol, math manipulatives, the graphing calculator increased use of the math lab to focus improvement in the areas of geometry and algebra skills.

 

Science strategies utilize reading in the content area skills as many students experience difficulty in comprehending reading the science textbooks. Science vocabulary and terminology is another area of difficulty. Additional strategies that the science teachers use include making connections to careers in science and making inter-disciplinary connections to build comprehension skills.  Teachers provide more intensive hands-on activities to facilitate understanding of content and of the scientific method.  The use of the PA PSSA Assessment Anchor Coach will be utilized by all grades for test-taking strategies. 

The use of technology (Wiki Reports, etc) is a strong component of science classes.

 

SIP # 4. Incorporate strategies based on scientifically based research that will strengthen the core academic subjects in the school and address the academic issues that caused the school to be identified for school improvement. (NA if school is not in any level of improvement.)

The math and literacy labs utilize the standards-based programs of Achieve 3000, Study Island, and Carnegie Learning, for individualized skills practice in the areas of:

Geometry, using measurement investigations with protractor and manipulatives. In algebra, instruction focuses on algebraic functions and relations, with emphasis on linear equations. 

Literacy skills in English classes and in the content areas focus on:  reading comprehension skills, academic vocabulary development, text organization, analysis of non-fiction literacy skills.  Reading in the content areas has been a focus and stresses constructed responses across content areas, summarization skills and inferencing skills.  Six classes are Classroom For the Future classes with Promethean board technology.

 

 

 

 

SWP # 5. Describe the specific strategies that will be used, in addition to those described above, to meet the needs of historically underrepresented groups, including low-achieving children and other children at risk of not meeting the State standards. (Strategies may include counseling, mentoring, college and career awareness and preparation, integration of technical and vocational education and other innovative teaching methods.)

SAT math class offers preparation in preparing for the SAT for college entrance.

Promethean Board technology is available in 6 classrooms in English, Social Studies, math and science.

The College Access Program provides assistance with completion of college applications and financial aid applications. 

The Summer Mentorship Program is partnership between the School District and the University of Pennsylvania for a summer opportunity for current 10th and 11th graders to learn about college and careers in multiple fields.

The Summer Search Program is a national leadership development program that provides mentoring and summer experiential education to develop low-income students into their full potential as leaders who complete a post-secondary degree and give back to their communities.

 

Corrective Reading and Corrective Math classes are rostered for identified Special Education students. 

Participation in electives with the human services skills and career focus is a unique opportunity for all students.

 

 

 

SWP # 12. Describe how students who experience difficulty mastering proficient or advanced levels will be identified. Identification of students must be done in a timely basis to provide sufficient information on which to base effective assistance. Include a description of the intervention for identified students. (Note: If the school is identified for school improvement for two consecutive years, all students from low-income families must be offered supplemental education services. These services may include tutoring, remediation and other academic interventions outside of the regular school day or during the summer.) (I)

 

This year’s benchmark and predictive tests, along with the Corrective/SRA benchmark tests identified students in need of interventions.  Teachers are provided disaggregated performance data (per SchoolNet, the instructional management system) on a quarterly basis to identify under-achieving students in the school and develop intervention plans to assist these students in the areas of Literacy/reading/language arts and mathematics.  Services provided by the regular program to enable under-performing students to meet standards: The School District implemented Corrective Reading and Corrective Math instruction for students identified by data on school district’s performance on improving under-performing schools. They provided additional school personnel, support, and resources. The District’s Summer School programs are designed to provide interventions to underperforming students.

Daily common planning time is scheduled into the master roster to allow for department teams to meet and identify school–wide areas of need and plan for specific instructional plans.  Teachers in professional learning communities design CSAP “Intervention Plans” that require specific intervention activities for students. Intervention Plans are reviewed by CSAP Team, counselor, parent, student and the Principal at teacher meetings and conferences. During the 2010-2011 school year, all teachers will design academic improvement plans

for targeted students to maximize achievement for our under-represented minority population.

Robeson services are provided by categorical funds to enable under-performing students to meet standards. Title I funds will be used to continue afternoon tutoring for students who are performing below basic in mathematics and reading. School Improvement funds support on-going professional development via consultants and substitutes. Teacher leadership and collaboration among the staff through planning, team work, and professional development will be recognized with compensation. Additionally, additional technology will be purchased to support under- performing students’ needs.

 

 

3. Comprehensive Academic Program (Arts, music, PE): What are the school’s plans to involve all students and increase the involvement of under-represented and/or under-performing groups in a comprehensive education by providing access to and involvement in a high-quality program of studies in the Core Curriculum beyond reading and math?  Please be sure to address physical education, arts, music, nutrition, etc.

 

A.     All students – All students have access to music every day and PE very day as evidenced by students’ daily rosters. All students have access to the Urban Nutrition Initiative weekly. We will add elective courses in human services.

 

B. Under-performing and/or under-represented student groups – IEP students have access to music classes every day and PE every day as evidenced by students’ daily rosters.

 

African American and Economically Disadvantaged students have access to music/art and PE everyday as evidenced by their daily rosters.

 

African American and Economically Disadvantaged students have access to the Urban Nutrition Initiative weekly as well as the human services electives.

 

There are accommodations provided to permit students with IEP’s the opportunity to participate in all activities to the maximum extent possible are: Accessible classroom/location, Advance notice of assignments, Alternative ways of completing assignments (e.g., oral presentation versus written paper), Course or program modifications, Document conversion (alternative print formats: large print, tape, electronic), Test modifications, Study skills and strategies training, Time extensions, Computer for exams, Glossaries and summaries, Acoustical sound treatment, Preferential seating, Adapted curriculum alignment and study guides.

 

C. How is this different from the past/previous practice?

In past years, students did not receive guitar classes. Next year, they will receive art classes.

 

4. Initiatives to Improve Instruction: What new initiatives will the school put in place to improve instructional delivery?  What professional development opportunities will be offered to all, new and/or struggling teachers?

 

A.   All teachers –  

Literacy in the content areas:  All teachers implement the cycle of effective instruction, dry-erase boards to check for understanding, summary frames and exit tickets with fidelity. 

 

Research skills:  teachers have planned – through backmapping from senior project year to ninth grade– for integration of research skills into a completed year-end product that will contribute toward the student’s senior project.  A Human Services theme will be integrated into the senior projects.

 

Math:  All teachers are implementing the cycle of effective instruction and integrating basic algebra and geometry formulas in weekly lessons to reinforce eligible content in the content areas with fidelity.

 

Professional development occurs at least one a week during common planning time meetings.  Monthly after-school professional development is provided to teachers on the core curriculum materials and the cycle of effective instruction.  Supports to new and/or struggling teachers are provided to improve the delivery of instruction and classroom management.

 

B. Under-performing and/or under-represented student groups –   

·       Literacy:  Corrective Reading and Achieve 3000 are implemented with fidelity.

·       Math:  Corrective Math, Carnegie Learning are implemented with fidelity.

 

The SEL is rostered into common planning time to increase collaboration among all teachers to support student academic achievement.  This will be done through rostering.

 

C. How is this different from the past/previous practice?

 

Last year we focused on Dr. Platt’s Mastery Objectives in raising the level of rigor and aligning instruction. This year, we will build on mastery objectives with a focus on the cycle of effective instruction, with emphasis on checking for understanding.  Professional development now uses the Access to the Core Strategies Guide and Achieve 3000 on a monthly basis for best practices and differentiation.  Teachers will begin creating a school-wide research skills plan for initial implementation this Spring.  Previously, Achieve 3000 was not offered as an elective class.

SWP # 7. Describe in detail, the high quality and on-going professional development that will be provided to teachers, principals, paraprofessionals, pupil services personnel, parents and other staff to enable all children to meet the State standards.

Professional development covers the entire cycle of effective instruction, including direct instruction, guided practice, checking for understanding, independent practice, formative assessments and closure/exit tickets.

 

Teachers, paraprofessionals and support staff participate in training from the Access to the

Core Strategies Guide. Specifically, we have a monthly focus on: Creating an Environment

for Learning with focus on positive behavior supports, classroom management, planning for

instruction, student profiles (p. 3-46), Structure of an Effective Lesson (p. 4-11), 150 Ways to

Present Information (p. 4-56), Assessment.

 

Parents receive training in Seven Secrets of How to Study.

 

SIP # 6. Provide an assurance that the school will spend not less than 10% of Title I funds for professional development.

The English Chair, whose salary is partially funded by Title I funds, provides weekly

professional development, with appropriate documentation to ensure compliance with the

minimum of 10% of Title I funds used for this purpose.

 

SIP # 12. Incorporate a teacher mentoring program. (NA if school is not in any level of improvement.)

 

The Department Chairs serve as mentors to new teachers and meet weekly. A log is kept by mentors of meeting agendas and topics. The Chairs and principal provide weekly mentoring to all teachers in need of improvement.

 

 

 

SWP # 8. Describe the strategies used to attract high-quality, highly qualified teachers to high need schools.

The principal participates in 50/50 site selection, attending site selection fairs hosted by the School District. The school involves community stakeholders in the site selection process.  We advertise on our school’s website, highlighting our school’s programs and points of pride. We  participate in the Inquirer’s School Edition, and the district’s website.  We participate in the District’s annual High School Fair and the High School Directory for the High School Planning Guide. We have an active Home and School Association and a shared decision making model. 

 

 

 

5. School Climate: How will the school use current behavior supports and systems to address a positive learning environment?  (i.e. Positive Behavior Supports)

 

A.  All students – As reported by the Annual School Reports and the Mid-Year Review:

·       There will be a 20% reduction in the number of chronically truant students.

 

B. Under-performing and/or under-represented student groups –

·       There will be a 20% reduction in the number of discipline referral for students cutting classes.

·       There will be a 20% reduction in the number of suspensions as reported in SchoolNet.

 

·       By June 2011, 91% of African American and Economically Disadvantaged students will attend school daily, on the average.

·       By June 2011, 15% (from 40% to 25%) of African American and Economically Disadvantaged students will have reduced their truancy rate.

 

The CSAP process will be used to access internal school barriers and provide external community-based resources. CSAP begins is the classroom, where the classroom teacher analyzes the strengths and learning needs of his or her students and adapts instruction and environment to create optimal learning conditions.  There is a grade level case management system established to monitor implementation of goals and progress of students referred.  These cases are reviewed weekly, monthly and quarterly to review, adjust, and modify level of support for the target student(s).  Parents are fully involved in the process and keep aware of progress.

 

C. How is this different from the past/previous practice?

 

We have students as mentors and have a fully operational Peer Mediation Team. 

Due to the long-term absence of the school counselor, student monitoring and tracking of their own attendance rates through the individual learning plans on the information management system (SchoolNet, StudentNet) has been limited.

 

6. School Safety: How will the school use regional, district and school personnel to ensure and support a safe and orderly learning environment? (i.e. crisis and deployment plans).

 

A. All students – At the beginning of the school year, during opening day activities, the Climate and Safety Team will review the Crisis Plan and the School Safety Plan with all staff.

 

B. Under-performing and/or under-represented student groups –  

·       By June 2011, there will be a 50% decrease in the number of African American and Economically Disadvantaged students suspended.

·       By June 2011, 10% increase in the number of trained peer mediators.

 

 

C. How is this different from the past/previous practice?

 

17 students were trained as peer mediators in Spring 2010.  We intend to train more students and to monitor the number of peer mediations that occur this year.

 

We review discipline data on a monthly basis to improve climate issues.  Student leaders will be included for the first time.

 

 

 

7. Enrichment: How will the school address issues related to the involvement of all students in areas such as clubs, after school programs, sports, intra-mural activities, band, etc?

 

A.   All students – There will be a 10% increase in recruitment activities for all enrichment programs (clubs, after-school programs, sports, intramural activities, and community service events) as evidenced by club rosters.

 

B.  Under-performing and/or under-represented student groups – There will be a 10% increase in the involvement of under-performing and under-represented groups in intramural activities and after-school programs as evidenced by club rosters.

 

There are accommodations that are provided to permit students with IEP’s the opportunity to participate in all activities to the maximum extent possible.  They are accessible classroom/location, advance notice of assignments, alternative ways of completing assignments (e.g., oral presentation versus written paper), course or program modifications, document conversion (alternative print formats: large print, tape, electronic), test modifications, study skills and strategies training, time extensions, computer for exams, glossaries and summaries, preferential seating, adapted curriculum alignment and study guides.

 

C.   How is this different from the past/previous practice?

 

We have added a robotics BEST and MATE program after school.  We have added the “Build On” club. We have intramural activities such as volleyball, Double Dutch jump rope contests, HOSA club activities, student docent training with the Paul Robeson House.

 

 

 

SWP # 4. Describe how the plan will increase the amount and quality of learning time. Such strategies might include:

* Extended School Year

* Before/After School Programs

AP classes in AP Government, AP Calculus, and the robotics club provide enrichment activities to students, along with the Debate Team and Mock Trial Team, the Penn Medicine Pipeline. We also offer an SAT Math prep class to students. The extended day program includes participation in the math and literacy labs. Students in the Math Lab after school uses the Carnegie Learning programs to accelerate learning.  Students in the Literacy/Math Lab use the Achieve 3000 and Carnegie Learning programs as enrichment activities according to the needs of each student.

The math intervention classes increase the amount and quality of learning time.

Tutoring in math and science before and after school increase learning opportunities. The robotics club and other clubs expand the quality of learning significantly as students are actively applying math, science, critical thinking and communication skills.

Supplemental Education Services (SES) are offered to eligible students.

 

* Other Strategies to Enrich/Accelerate the Curriculum

SIP # 11. Incorporate as appropriate activities before school, after school, during the summer and during the extension of the school year. (NA if school is not in any level of improvement.)

Dual enrollment programs at Community College, Drexel and Penn offer extended enrichment opportunities for students. Also, students are offered the opportunity to participate in

the Penntutoring Program after school and the Summer Mentorship Program.  Selected students participate in the Summer Search mentoring program also.

            Parents will receive instructions and a commitment form to encourage their child to read independently for 15-20 minutes each day.

 

 

8. Parent and Community Involvement: Significantly increase the involvement of a broad base of parents and community at the school level.

 

A.  All parents – There will be a 20% increase in the number of parents attending the Home and School Association monthly meetings and the “curriculum class nights.”

 

B.  Under-represented parent groups – There will be a 20% increase in the number of parents who  will receive training from Dr. Stephen Jones and his book:  Seven Secrets on How to Study in order to help their child experience greater success in high school. Parents will also receive training in Reading for Their Life, a book that addresses African American males and literacy.

 

Parents are given literature about the CSAP system through pamphlets, newsletters and poster boards in school hallways.  Parents are made aware if they believe their child has a difficulty in a subject area that they request the CSAP process to begin for their child.  Parents are told of the services provided to all eligible students who qualify for special education services.  Parents from different language backgrounds have the opportunity to be given interpretive services to explain any document or translate.  Programming and services pamphlets with timelines are presented to parent to give them better meaning as what is anticipated for the process.

 

C.  How is this different from the past/previous practice?

 

In previous years, there has been a 5% attendance rate for Home and School Association meetings and events.

 

SWP # 9. Describe the strategies used to increase parental involvement, such as family literacy services.

The 1% Title I set aside for parental involvement is used to purchase books for parents to help

their child succeed in high school. 

The school will host Class Parent Nights throughout the year to increase parental involvement.

Increased monthly communications will be sent home to

highlight student achievement and school updates. Home and School will increase membership.

The school holds a Title I meeting in September to discuss Title compliance and parents receive

the School’s Family Involvement Policy and the School-Parent Compact.

A Back-to-School Night is held in September and parents are given a copy of the Student/Parent

Handbook. The school hosts three report card conferences.

College financial aid nights are organized by the College Access counselor and the school

counselor. 

The Home and School Association meetings coordinate workshops on ParentNet, Title I,

understanding the core curriculum, college admissions, and the PSSA.

The school participates in the Welfare to Work Parent Partners program and the Mayor’s Foster

Grandparents program, with several volunteers currently at Robeson. 

 

SIP # 1 Describe how the school will provide written notice about the school improvement

identification to parents of each student enrolled in the school. (NA if school is

not in any level of improvement.)

Accountability Letters are prepared centrally for each school in School Improvement to explain

why this school was identified. The school sends the letters to the homes of all students.

 

SIP # 10. Include all strategies to promote effective parental involvement at school. (NA if school is not in any level of improvement.)

Title I Meeting

Right to Know Letters

Home and School Association meetings   &  FamilyNet workshop   &   School budget meetings

Ninth Grade Orientation Parent Session on: Secrets on How to Study with Dr. Stephen Jones

ParentLink autodialer communications

Monthly newsletters

Parent Partners  &  Foster Grandparents

Report Card Conferences

Back-to-School Night  &  Poetry Night

IEP meetings

College Financial aide workshops   &   FAFSA Workshops

Philly Cares Day

Monthly Honor Roll and Awards Assemblies

Weekly vocabulary contests

College and Career Day

 

 

SWP # 15. Describe how the school will provide individual student academic assessment results in a language parents can understand, including an interpretation of those results. (2)(B)(iv)

 

Report Card conferences provide the time and opportunity to provide individual assessment

results to parents in a parent friendly manner and language. Interim Reports are sent home every

semester to inform parents about their child’ progress. IEP meetings occur throughout the

year and provide key assessment information to parents. The Home and School Association

arranges workshops about FamilyNet and how parents can access their child’s data.

 


Action Plan

 

Goal #1 Significantly increase academic achievement and learning for all students, including closing the achievement gap.

Description of Specific Actions or Strategies to Improve Educational Practice that are aligned to a School’s Major Objectives

 

 

Persons

Responsible

 

 

Professional

Development

 

 

Related

Expenditures/

Estimated Cost

 

Funding

Source

All

Responsibilities

1.1  SIP#9 Specify the responsibilities of the school, the local educational agency and the State Educational agency serving the school. (NA if school is not in any level of improvement

     It is the school’s responsibility to improve student achievement and ensure that supports are provided for every student to succeed.  The administration and teachers meet to discuss student data during daily common planning time.  We review PSSA data, Benchmark, and teacher-made assessments.

     The Department Chairs review the data from Schoolnet after each Benchmark administration and the departments meet in professional learning communities to plan for adjustments in instruction. Each monthly goal for each department focuses on the same literacy strategy in reading comprehension and algebra and geometry according to student data. The administration and Leadership Team provide data trends and goals for each professional learning community.  The principal meets with each department chair and individual teacher to monitor student progress. The principal monitors teacher lesson plans and teacher data binders. Data is posted in a Data Room for review by all. Data is shared in teacher-student in benchmark conferences; Formal and Informal Observations and feedback to teachers provide information on improving teaching and learning.

 

 

 

1.1  All

 A. 

·       Develop rigorous and relevant lesson plans using the cycle of effective instruction.

·       All students will maintain PSSA Folders for student work samples in constructed responses across the content areas.

·       Ongoing monitoring of student performance data by reviewing Predictive, Benchmark and report card data trends

 

Principal

Department Chairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Math Dept. Chair

 

 

 

 

 

 

Principal and Leadership Team; English Dept.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Principal and Teachers

SEL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Math strategies:  algebraic functions, math manipulatives

Geometry skills

TI-Inspire Calculators

Targeted Audience:  Math and Science teachers

 

 

 

Differentiated Instruction

Achieve 3000

Targeted Audience:  English Dept.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cycle of effective instruction

Targeted Audience:  All Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After-school PD

 

 

 

 

 

.2 Literacy teacher

($18, 900)

Achieve 3000

 

$5, 000 for 150 licenses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title I

 

 

 

 

 

 

Title I

 

 

 

 

Operating

1.2  Under-represented groups

B.

·       Use Corrective Reading and Corrective Math to increase oral reading fluency and mastery of basic reading and math skills.

 

·       Institute common planning time to allow teachers to collaborate in planning lessons and differentiate lessons for struggling learners. Hold CSAP meetings to review and monitor intervention plans for targeted students.

·       Use web-based supplemental materials to reinforce and remediate weak academic skills [Carnegie Learning and Achieve 3000]

 

Principal and Leadership team

 

 

 

Department Chairs

 

 

 

Corrective Math/Corrective Reading with SRA consultants to ensure program is being implemented.

Targeted Audience:  Special Ed. Teachers

 

Aligning data to instruction to assist students with comprehending content area and develop strategies for understanding textbook terminology

Targeted Audience:  All Staff

Carnegie and Achieve 3000

Targeted Audience:  Math  and English Teachers

 

 

 

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After-school PD EC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating

 

 

1.3 How is this different from the past/previous practice?

C.  In prior years, weekly common planning time meetings were not built into teachers’ schedules. 

Last year, only juniors used the Student Writing Folders system in English and Math; web-based interventions have expanded.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How will you monitor program implementation?

Include monitoring measurements for all Actions

When will you monitor?

Provide specific dates

·       Leadership/Division walkthroughs to monitor effectiveness of implementation of strategies

·       Lesson plans which reflect differentiation

·       Report card grades and Benchmark/Predictive assessments

·       Common planning time agendas

SWP # 6 . Describe the on-going plan to assess the implementation and results achieved by the SWP using the PSSA, other State indicators of success and other locally determined indicators of achievement. Determine if the SWP has been effective in increasing the extent to which students are meeting the State standards, particularly those students who had been furthest from achieving those standards and the process that will be used to revise the plan if necessary. (Note: If the school is identified for school improvement, the SWP plan would need to be revised to reflect changes that address the reasons the school failed to meet adequate yearly progress.)

 

Goals for each content area are re-visited each month in professional learning communities/departments. Formal and informal walk-throughs by administration and peers provide feedback on the effectiveness of teaching and learning.

     The 2010 PSSA data has been reviewed to determine identified students for interventions in reading and math.  The teachers provide explicit instruction and small group tutorials. Review of weak areas such as geometry and slope of a line; increased use of calculators; use of peer evaluations using rubrics for open-ended questions; use of dry-erase boards for immediate feedback and exit tickets.

 

Instructional Plan:  The Do Nows, open-ended questions, assessments and monthly foci will be planned by the math department under the leadership of the Math Chair. The principal and Math Chair monitor the monthly plan to ensure alignment to the core curriculum.  Intervention plans for individual students will include extra time in the math lab.

    

SIP # 8 Establish specific annual, measureable objectives for continuous and substantial progress by each group of students specified in Section 1111 (b)(2)(C)(v) and enrolled in the school. (NA if school is not in any level of improvement.)

Our annual 2011 AYP target in Math is 60% proficiency. 

·       Leadership Team – Daily

·       Lesson Plans – Weekly

·       Departmental Team meeting agendas – Weekly

     Progress towards these goals are monitored monthly.  Attendance, tardiness, and CSAP data is monitored daily and weekly.

 

     The student work folders will be reviewed each week by department chairs and administration.  Teachers will monitor the daily entries or the student folders and hold benchmark conferences in quarterly class meetings and individual conferences.

     Lesson plans are monitored weekly. Informal and formal observations are completed weekly with the principal visiting 3-5 classrooms daily and providing feedback.

 

Goal #2 Ensure that all students have access to a comprehensive education by providing a high-quality program of studies in the Core Curriculum.

 

Description of Specific Actions or Strategies to Improve Educational Practice that are aligned to a School’s Major Objectives

 

 

Persons

Responsible

 

 

Professional

Development

 

 

Related

Expenditures/

Estimated Cost

 

Funding

Source

2.1  All

A. Teachers use the Core Curriculum with related Strategies Guide to plan and deliver rigorous and student-centered lessons.

 

Weekly lesson plans reflect the cycle of effective instruction and alignment with district content standards.

 

Principal

Dept. Chairs

Math and English teachers

Special Ed. Teachers

Technology Teacher

 

 

 

 

Access to the Core Strategies Guide

Targeted Audience:  All Staff

 

 

 

Cycle of Effective Instruction

Targeted Audience:  All Staff

 

Additional purchase of book for new teachers -$200

None

 

ASCD Training DVD - $300

 

Special Ed. High Incidence

 

 

 

 

Title I

2.2   Under-represented groups

B.  Regular and Special education teachers are scheduled together for common planning time in math and English, in order to align lessons with students’ IEP goals.

 

Supplemental materials were ordered for content area teachers such as calculators, hands-on science projects, primary sources in social studies, and foreign language materials.

 

 

 


SEL

Special Ed. Teachers

Extended Day Math and Literacy Lab Coordinators

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carnegie Learning

TI-Inspire Calculator

 

Targeted Audience:  Math Department

 

None

 

 

 

 

 

2.3  How is this different from the past/previous practice?

C.

     Math and Literacy computer labs were available to all students during classes and after school.

     Access to the Core strategies were integrated into all lessons by all teachers.

     Common planning time for Special Ed. and regular Ed. teachers

 

Principal & Leadership Team

SEL

Counselor

CSAP Team

 

Monthly PD in Access to the Core strategies

 

Targeted Audience:  All Staff

Prof. Dev. Hourly Rates:

$47.62 hr for Prof. Dev. Planning

$58.36 Teacher Leaders

$35.17 teacher participant

 

Operating Budget

E.C. funds

 

How will you monitor program implementation?

Include monitoring measurements for all Actions

When will you monitor?

Provide specific dates

Math Computer Lab

GRADE

First in Math

 

Carnegie

Learning

SAT/PSSA Prep

9th

Intervention

Daily

Powlen/Crawford

Thurs      Wed

Powlen/Crawford

(Th)         (W)

Crawford

1x month

Open-ended

Powlen (M)

 

 

 

10th

Crawford

Crawford (W)

Crawford (W)

Crawford(W)

Open-ended

Crawford (W)

 

 

 

11th

Phan      (T)

Powlen(Th)

Phan (T)

Powlen (Th

Phan (T)

Powlen (Th)

Phan (M-F)

Powlen “ 

Open-ended

Powlen (M)

 

 

ALL (M)

12th

Phan    (T)

Phan

Phan

Phan

 

The Literacy Computer Lab and the Math Lab – daily. 

The principal and department chairs monitors instruction – daily

The literacy labs – daily

Lesson plans – Weekly

Common Planning time agenda – Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goal #3 Involve all students and increase the involvement of under-represented and/or under-performing groups in a high-quality program of studies in the Core Curriculum beyond reading and math.  (Be sure to address physical education, arts, music, etc.)

Description of Specific Actions or Strategies to Improve Educational Practice that are aligned to a School’s Major Objectives

 

 

Persons

Responsible

 

 

Professional

Development

 

 

Related

Expenditures/

Estimated Cost

 

Funding

Source

3.1  All

All students are offered art, theatre, and Physical Education classes including the following:

·       Foreign Language

·       Physical Fitness

·       Intramural Sports

·       Art Class

·       Human Services electives

Integrate the arts through the teaching posters provided from the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Principal

Teachers

 

 

 

 

 

Phila. Museum of Art’s Wachovia Education Resource Center’s Teacher Workshops

Targeted Audience:  All Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

None

 

Operating

3.2  Under-represented groups

B.  All students are offered music, theatre, and Physical Education classes including the following:

·       Foreign Language

·       Physical Fitness

·       Intramural Sports

·       Art  Class

·       Human Services electives

Integrate the arts through the teaching posters provided from the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

 

Principal

Roster Chair

Teachers

 

 

Art Supplies

Phila. Museum of Art’s Wachovia Education Resource Center’s Teacher Workshops

Human Services curriculum

 

Targeted Audience:  All Staff

 

 

 

 

1,000

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

 

Operating

 

 

Operating

3.3  How is this different from the past/previous practice?

C.  

In previous years, art classes were not offered.  Human Services elective courses will be offered.

 

 

 

 

 

How will you monitor program implementation?

Include monitoring measurements for all Actions

When will you monitor?

Provide specific dates

Use district performance monitoring tool for monitoring enrollment in classes.

Mid-Year Performance Target Review

Annual School Review

 

Goal #4 Improve instructional delivery to all students using best practices and whole school reform models.

Description of Specific Actions or Strategies to Improve Educational Practice that are aligned to a School’s Major Objectives

 

 

Persons

Responsible

 

 

Professional

Development

 

 

Related

Expenditures/

Estimated Cost

 

Funding

Source

4.1 All

A.  All teachers use Mastery Objectives and the Cycle of Effective Instruction, with focus on checking for understanding, to deliver daily lessons in alignment with standards.

 

Reading in the content areas was a focus in all classes.

Promethean technology and dry-erase boards are used in math classes and Classroom For the Future.

 

Principal

Leadership Team

 

English Dept.

 

Technology Teacher Leader, Teachers

 

Cycle of Effective Instruction

Teaching for Understanding

Reading comprehension strategies

Targeted Audience:  All Staff

 

 CFF Support Personnel

Targeted Audience:  six CFF teachers

 

ASCD DVDs

$300

Math hands-on

Materials – 1,000

 

 

Title I

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.2  Under-represented groups

B.  Teachers implement differentiated instruction by integrating Access to the Core strategies into daily teaching and by utilizing the Achieve 3000 program daily.

 

 

SEL

Principal

Leadership Team

 

 

 

 

Access to the Core Strategies Guide

Achieve 3000 Program

 

 

 

Facilitator prep time

None

 

EC Funds

4.3 How is this different from the past/previous practice?

C.  In previous years, teachers did not focus on the cycle of effective instruction with a greater depth of implementation in using criteria for success, checking for understanding and closure strategies.

Monthly professional development centers on Access to the Core and the formal and informal Classroom Observation of Teaching Performance.

Principal

Formal and Informal Classroom Observation of Teaching Performance tool.

None

Operating

How will you monitor program implementation?

Include monitoring measurements for all Actions

When will you monitor?

Provide specific dates

The principal conducts formal and informal observations.  The principal conduct informal observations daily with timely feedback to teachers.   The Informal Classroom Observation of Teaching Performance form is the feedback tool used.  Teachers have access to weekly professional development in weekly faculty meetings, using common planning time by departments.

The focus of the informal observations is the cycle of effective instruction and the integration of reading skills in the content areas.

 

Teachers set professional learning goals in individual conference with the principal in September, April and June.

2010-2011 Formal and Informal Observations

Professional Goal-setting Conferences

 

 

 

 

Goal #5 Ensure a positive learning environment by use of current behavior supports and systems.   (ex: Positive Behavior Supports)

Description of Specific Actions or Strategies to Improve Educational Practice that are aligned to a School’s Major Objectives

 

 

Persons

Responsible

 

 

Professional

Development

 

 

Related

Expenditures/

Estimated Cost

 

Funding

Source

5.1 All

A.  All students participated in developing a school-wide Positive Behavior Support Plan and assisted in the implementation of the Student Climate Support Team, consisting of:

·       students as mentors.

·       Monthly newsletters recognizing students who improved

·       Class Sponsor meetings with students and attendance objectives

·       Peer Mediation Team in effect

 

 

Student Government

 

CSAP Team

Climate & Safety Team

Attendance Team

 

 

Class Sponsors

Counselor

 

 

Access to the Core Curriculum Strategies Guide

SchoolNet

StudentNet

FamilyNet

 

Spare Uniforms

$100

 

Awards certificates & student incentives

$1,000

 

Operating

budget

 

 

Operating

budget

5.2  Under-represented groups

B. ILP sessions conducted during Advisory period.

 

B. ILPs completed by10th graders also.

 

Counselor and Advisors

Students

CSAP Team

 

 

 

 

Peer Mediation training for new members

 

 

None

 

 

 

5.3 How is this different from the past/previous practice?

C. New elements of the PBS Plan student mentors; the monthly newsletter to inform parents of ILPs, FamilyNet; class sponsor meetings and ILP for 10th graders.  Students tracking their attendance and lateness is new.

 

Peer Mediation began in May 2010.

 

Principal

Counselor

 

 

 

How will you monitor program implementation?

Include monitoring measurements for all Actions

The Principal and Attendance Team monitor the Average Daily Attendance (ADA) data trends and begin CSAP process and interventions for students after 3 unexcused absences and 5 latenesses. The CSAP list on Schoolnet is monitored weekly. The Principal, Attendance Team, Class Sponsors, Student Leaders, and Climate and Safety Team will meet weekly to set and monitor goals to reduce truancy and tardiness. 

 

Advisors

Students are given opportunities throughout the first semester to set individual attendance and academic goals and to track their progress on StudentNet in their ILPs throughout the year.

 

CSAP meetings with parents, teachers, student are held weekly.  The Counselor and CSAP Coordinator created a calendar of monthly meetings with parents.

 

Counselor-

The Counselor makes weekly entries in the CSAP Log and this is reviewed monthly by the Principal.  The Counselor will train additional Peer Mediators and monitor the number of peer mediations that occur and their results.

 

Student Government leaders meet with advisors by grade level and jointly develop a school-wide Positive Behavior Support Plan that address behavioral expectations, attendance goals, Late policy, the uniform policy, dress policy for “Dress-down Days,” cafeteria expectations, and homework policy.

Class Sponsors supervise the student mentors and hall monitors.  Weekly reports on data trends from class cut slips and Schoolnet provide information on progress toward goals.

The principal and Climate and Safety Team review pink slips weekly and set goals to reduce suspensions and serious incidents.

When will you monitor?

Provide specific dates

The Climate and Safety Team in collaboration with the Class Sponsors, and the Home and School Association will be responsible for monthly Awards Assemblies. The schedule will be as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

Goal #6 Ensure and support a safe and orderly learning environment by use of regional, district and school personnel (i.e., crisis and deployment plans)

Description of Specific Actions or Strategies to Improve Educational Practice that are aligned to a School’s Major Objectives

 

 

Persons

Responsible

 

 

Professional

Development

 

 

Related

Expenditures/

Estimated Cost

 

Funding

Source

6.1  All

A.  Each member of the Climate and Safety Team will become the case manager for a grade level with the responsibility to: review discipline slips weekly and summarize data trends and interventions. The team receives and provides regular safety and crisis professional development.  Project Wisdom announcements continue; implementation of school-wide positive behavior supports and incentives.

 

Principal

SPO

Climate & Safety Team members

Office of School Climate & Safety

 

 

Crisis Plan

-Shelter-in-Place procedures

-Lockdown procedures

-bomb threats

-fire drills

-communication protocols

 

 

None

 

 

Project Wisdom - $300

 

 

 

 

Operating

6.2  Under-represented groups

B.  The SEL and Special Education teachers are active members of the Safety Team and provide professional development in positive discipline methods and safety.

 

B.  The Counselor will train the second cohort of Peer Mediators and track the number of Peer Mediations and their results.

 

SEL

Special Ed. teacher

 

 

Counselor

 

 

Safety and crisis procedures

 

 

 

Peer Mediation; conflict resolution

 

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.3 How is this different from the past/previous practice?

C.  The Safety Team receives on-going training from central office personnel and regional personnel.

In previous years, class committees served as the leadership along with Student Government.  The new class officers for the tenth grade class will begin the process of electing officers for all classes.

Central Office – Office of School Climate and Safety

 

Principal and Leadership Team

Anti-bullying

Safety and crisis procedures

 

 

Class Meeting rules

None

 

 

 

Class Sponsor

EC

 

 

 

 

Operating

How will you monitor program implementation?

Include monitoring measurements for all Actions

When will you monitor?

Provide specific dates

The Principal and School Police Officer review the disciplinary referrals weekly and provide them to the Climate & Safety Team. 

Safety plans are practiced quarterly.

Peer Mediation data is reviewed weekly.

SchoolNet data and Scholarchip data provide information on goals. 

Climate and Safety Team meets weekly

Fire Drills conducted monthly

Lockdown procedures are practiced quarterly.  Shelter-in-Place occurs twice a year.

 

Goal #7  Increase the involvement of all students in areas such as clubs, after school programs, sports, intra-mural activities, band, etc.

Description of Specific Actions or Strategies to Improve Educational Practice that are aligned to a School’s Major Objectives

 

 

Persons

Responsible

 

 

Professional

Development

 

 

Related

Expenditures/

Estimated Cost

 

Funding

Source

7.1 All

A.  All students have increased opportunities to participate in after-school clubs, programs and sports through Freshman Orientation and an in-school assembly when faculty sponsors promote their clubs:  Debate Team, Mock Trials, Cheerleading, Double Dutch Competition, cooking club, Fruit Stand, Robotics Club, Build On, Student Docent Training with the Paul Robeson House, HOSA, etc.

 

 

Extra-curricular club sponsors

 

 

 

 

None

 

E.C. Hourly Rate for teachers

 

Urban Nutrition Initiative Grant

7.2 Under-represented groups

B.  No students will be denied participation in an extra-curricular activity due to cost.

 

Principal

Faculty Sponsors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.3 How is this different from the past/previous practice?

In previous years, we did not have a Club Showcase at various venues:  school assemblies, Freshman Orientation, Back-to-School-Night, Class Nights.

 

 

 

 

How will you monitor program implementation?

Include monitoring measurements for all Actions

When will you monitor?

Provide specific dates

Faculty club sponsors provide agendas and student sign-in of all meetings.  Club sponsors provide a calendar of all meeting/activity dates, time, and locations.  Each club has a binder in the Main Office which contains this information.

September - Orientation Session for club sponsors

September - Back to School Night - Parent Orientation for clubs and enrichment opportunities

October – June – Monthly Sponsors meeting with principal.

April 2011 – Sophomore Class Night

 

 

 

 

Goal #8 Significantly increases the involvement of a broad base of parents and community at the school level.

Description of Specific Actions or Strategies to Improve Educational Practice that are aligned to a School’s Major Objectives

 

 

Persons

Responsible

 

 

Professional

Development

 

 

Related

Expenditures/

Estimated Cost

 

Funding

Source

8.1  All

  • We have increased monthly communications with parents via monthly newsletters and parent recognition.
  • All parents have received Student and Parent handbooks at Ninth Grade Orientation in the August and at Back to School Night in September.
  • A Senior Parent Night was held, along with Junior, Sophomore and Freshman Parent Nights.
  • All parents are contacted via the Parent Link Autodialer for daily and weekly updates.
  • All parents received Title I information in September and throughout the year.
  • Parents will be invited to participate in two school-wide activities:  The annual Human Services Fair
  • And the “Robeson Spring into Health Fair”.

 

 

Principal

Home and School Assoc.

 

Newsletter/Newspaper Sponsor

Counselor

 

 

 

 

Principal

 

Counselor

Health Teachers (HRT and Phys. Ed.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIP Certificates & pins for parent participation

Printing costs

$2,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertising Costs

Operating

Budget

 

Title I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating

8.2  Under-represented groups

 

·A quarterly newsletter is distributed to parents and families of special education students to keep them informed of best practices and advocacy skills.

·Parents are informed of their child’s progress in the special education interventions and in the regular ed. curriculum.

 

Principal

Leadership Team

 

 

 

 

 

High School Parent Guide

Career Planning and Educational Choices

Targeted Audience:  Parents

 

$1, 250

 

Title I

8.3 How is this different from the past/previous practice?

 

In previous years, we have not created a parent newsletter specifically for special education educational practices and policies.

Principal

Counselor

Special Ed. teachers

Computer publishing software

Targeted Audience:  Special Ed. teachers

Printing costs

EC

Operating

 

How will you monitor program implementation?

Include monitoring measurements for all Actions

When will you monitor?

Provide specific dates

Monthly newsletters are sent home.

 

Home and School monthly agendas and membership sign-in.

 

Home and School Calendar of monthly meeting dates

Sign-in sheets for all parent and community activities are monitored monthly.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Action Plan School Advisory Team Members

 

SDP expects that this plan be reviewed and updated throughout the school year by members of the school’s advisory team, including    the proposed expenditures of funds.  The below make- up of a leadership team is an example.  Please add additional members as appropriate:

 

 

Names  of School Advisory Team Members

 

 

 

 

 

Member’s Signature

Principal

Classroom

Teacher

Other School

       Staff: _______________

Parent or Community Member

Student

(As appropriate)

Other member: ______________

Hiromi

Hernandez

 

rib caged heart.JPG

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

Lisa Fernandez-Barnes

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

Raven Hooper

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Melvene Gainey

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Raymond Jefferson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Nija Birchett

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

Hung Phan

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

Karla Johnson

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jason Richardson

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

Corinne Kelly

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

Evan Kramp

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signatures and Assurances

 

 

Our school recommends this school plan and its related expenditures to the Regional Office for approval, and assures the following:

 

1.     The School Advisory Team sought and considered all recommendations from the following groups or committees (as appropriate) before adopting this plan (Check those that apply).

 

___X_ Home School Association or School Parents

____ Title 1 Parent Council

____ Community Based Organization

___X_ School Safety Team Members

___X_ Other (s): ___Student Leaders_______________

 

2. The School Advisory Team reviewed the content requirements for school plans of programs and believes all such requirements have been met.

 

3. This Action Plan is based upon thorough analysis of student academic performance. The actions proposed herein form a sound, comprehensive, coordinated plan to reach stated school goals to improve student academic performance.

 

4. The School Advisory team met with members of the parent and school community on the following date (prior to the submission of the Action plan) to provide an overview of the plan and receive feedback from the school community.  

 

_April 29, 2011 ____________________

 

5. The School Advisory team will meet with members of the parent and school community on the following date (after the approval of the Action plan) to provide an update on the approved plan and receive feedback from the school community.  

 

___June 16, 2011___________________

 

 

6. This school plan was adopted by the School Advisory Council on: _5/2/11_________________________