Abraham Lincoln High School 9-12

Principal
Mr. Jack Nelson

3201 Ryan Avenue
Philadelphia PA 19136
Phone: 215-400-3300

With Malice Toward None

Course Catalog

Course Catalog

Abraham Lincoln High School

Course Catalog

Mr.  Jack Nelson, Principal

 

 

Administration

 

School Reform Commission

 Joyce S.Wilerson - Chair

William J. Green - Member

Farah Jimenez - Member

Dr. Christopher McGinley - Member 

School District Administration

 

 

School District Administration

William R. Hite, Jr., Superintendent of Schools

 

Paul Kihn, Deputy Superintendent

Matthew E. Stanski, Chief Financial Office

Evelyn Sample-Oates, Chief of Family and Community Engagement

Karyn T. Lynch, Chief of Student Services

Melanie S. Harris, Chief Information Officer

Michael A. Davis, General Counsel

 

School Administration

Mr. Jack Nelson, Principal

Lynne Podrat, Assistant Principal

Cynthia Rhodes, Assistant Principal

David Lon, Assistant Principal 

Brian Garwood, School Climate Manager


General Information Page

High School Academies

 

                  To implement Abraham Lincoln High School's philosophy and goals, the school has been reorganized into six individual Academy programs, each with its own theme, space, faculty, coordinator and support staff.  Academies include the following: Academy of Fine and Performing Arts, Business Academy, Health Academy, Environmental Technology Academy, Horticulture Academy,  and the Law and Public Administration Academy.  Each Academy provides rigorous classroom theory, hands-on experience, relationships with private businesses and government, research, and field trips while addressing the particular needs and strengths of the students it serves .  Students are rostered to selected teachers who concentrate on inter-related subjects and themes.  Within this structure, student supports are provided, parental involvement is increased, teacher collaboration is encouraged, interdisciplinary programs are developed and the broader community becomes more involved. 

AFJROTC 

Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps is a program dedicated to the building of better citizens and students for America. The course focuses on air and space technologies.  Student may receive an elective credit for their participation in the program.

Counseling Department

Counselors work closely with students, parents, staff, and outside agencies.  They see students for a variety of reasons including academic issues, social issues, personal problems, crisis intervention, and college and career planning.  Referrals can be made by students, parents, or staff.  Counselor student cases are organized by alphabet.

 

Abraham Lincoln High School Alma Mater

Lincoln High School, Alma Mater

 

Mother of the Strong and Fair!

Sons and daughters sing thy praises

For thy loving, lasting care.

 

Friendship strong, thy bounty fosters,

Knowledge, wisdom, right and truth,

Brightly gleaming in the sunlight,

Serve the fleeting days of youth.

 

When in time we leave thy portals,

Heirs to what the world might hold,

May we go with wider vision

Toward horizons clear and bold.

 

Lincoln High School Alma Mater,

Mother of the fair and strong !

Pledge we now devotion endless

To thy gathering, growing throng.

 

Mission Statement                

The mission of Abraham Lincoln High School, the only All-Academy High School in Philadelphia, is to provide a rigorous academic program which will challenge and inspire our culturally diverse population and to offer a positive and safe environment which will enable our students to realize their maximum academic and career potential as successful, productive and responsible members of society.

 

Vision Statement 

We believe the smaller technologically advanced Lincoln High School of the future will develop the full academic potential of every student by providing a challenging high school experience, supported by staff and concerned parents/guardians in an environment where teaching is enjoyed, learning is active and all stakeholders take pride in their association with this exemplary institution

 

School Profile

Abraham Lincoln High School opened its doors in 1950 as the first school in what was then called District Eight. For sixty years, ALHS educated the youth of Northeast Philadelphia. In September 2010, Abraham Lincoln reopened in a brand new state of the art facility. Climate controlled and technologically current, Abraham Lincoln is poised to provide the best education for the 21st century. 

Abraham Lincoln High School is a large comprehensive secondary school located in Northeast Philadelphia.  It offers college preparatory, business, and vocational/technical programs which prepare students for postgraduate education, as well as military or government service entry into the work force. Students may select one of the curricular programs described below as well as choose to participate in a wide variety of activities which include: the Air Force JR. ROTC, PRIME, Science Fairs, the Philadelphia Flower Show, community service projects, band, choir, the newspaper, yearbook, debate, chess and sports teams. 

Other opportunities available to Lincoln students include educational activities at the Fox Chase Farm and the diverse benefits which accrue from the school's close working relationships with its International Sister Schools, Community College of Philadelphia, Delaware Valley College of Science and Agriculture, Drexel University, Holy Family College, Pennsylvania State University, and Temple University.

 Lincoln High School provides supportive services for all students needing additional help to succeed, including culturally and linguistically diverse students and students with disabilities. Lincoln also provides a full range of services for deaf and hard of hearing students of high school age.

 

 


School District of Philadelphia
Abraham Lincoln High School

3201 Ryan Ave.

Philadelphia, PA 19136

Phone 215-400-3300                       Fax 215-400-3301

 

Letter from the Principal 

 

Dear Students/Parents/Alumni & Colleagues,

 

Welcome to the Dawn of the New Lincoln High School, where the future is yours to build, and where all students succeed, as well as where all faculty and staff thrive! 

 

Abraham Lincoln Senior High School is an outstanding educational institution with more than 60 years of tradition in scholastic achievement, athletic performance, community service, and artistic expression. We are proud of each and every one of our 30,000 alumni.

 

We like to think of our students as members of the Abraham Lincoln Senior High School Family. The expectations of our students and the ingredients for success remain the same as they have for more than half a century:

 

Respect fellow students, teachers, administration, staff members, and the school facilities.

Use the resources available to seek out assistance from teachers, guidance counselors, department heads, academy coordinators, coaches, staff members, and the administration for help or career guidance.

 

  • Maintain a cooperative attitude in working with teachers, and authority figures.
  • Become actively involved in clubs, music, sports, and extra curricular activities.
  • Do their best and seek to become better by constantly challenging themselves.
  • Accept nothing less from themselves than the best they have to offer.
  • Be respectful of the surrounding community and our alumni.

 

Most of all, carry the title "Lincoln High School Student" with pride and contribute positively to the legacy through their deeds and actions.

 

Attitude is a key component of success; we will work hard to have all members of the Lincoln's Family of students, parents/guardians, alumni ,faculty/staff and administration embrace an attitude where "Failure is Not an Option."

Respectfully,
Jack Nelson

 


Education Requirements  

Promotion Requirements

 

1. Promotion from grade to grade should be based on credits earned:

  • Promotion to 10th grade - 5 credits
  • Promotion to 11th grade - 11 credits
  • Promotion to 12th grade -17.5 credit or sufficient number of credits to reach 23.5 by the end of 12th grade

 

2. A passing grade at the high school level is described as a D or higher (65 or higher).

 

Graduation

A Grade 12 student shall graduate if he/she has earned a total of 23.5 credits, which include:

 

Graduation Requirements - Class of 2007 & later

English

4

Credits

English 1, 2, 3, 4

Mathematics

3

Credits

Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2

Science

3

Credits

Physical Science, Biology, Chemistry

Social Studies

4

Credits

World History, African/Amer. History, American History, Social Science

World Languages

2

Credits

Must be 2 years of the same language

Arts & Humanities

2

Credits

Art, Drama, Dance, etc.

Physical Education

1

Credit

 

Health Education

0.5

Credit

 

Electives

4

Credits

One must be Math and/or Science

Total

23.5

Credits*

+ Graduation Project

 

A completed a Multidisciplinary Project or a Service Learning Project successfully. The culminating event is a presentation of your research paper, which details the results of your investigation.  You will be assessed with a rubric by a panel, which may include teachers, peers, community partners, employers and administrators.  Student reflection is the final step.  Each student will be assigned an advisor and given a booklet outlining further details.

Multidisciplinary Project

The State of Pennsylvania, the School District of Philadelphia and Abraham Lincoln High School require the satisfactory completion of a multidisciplinary project as a condition of graduation.

 

 Programs and Tracks         

 

Abraham Lincoln High School is an All-Academies School. Each student chooses affiliation in one of seven theme-based Academies. Individual Academies may have one or more tracks associated with specific career goals.

Advanced Placement         

 

Courses that are designated as "Advanced Placement Courses" will have more difficult content, a more intense pace, and more challenging assignments, experiences, and assessments. 

 

  • Incorporates an extensive survey of the major concepts, theories, approaches, frameworks of the discipline.
  • Includes student research/projects that exhibit at least one of the following:
  • Substantial mastery of essential qualities or enduring understanding of the discipline.
  • Independent work that addresses a major issue within a discipline.
  • Includes a critical review (with an interpretive stance) of a set of literature central to a basic understanding of the discipline.
  • Offers College/AP Credit.

 

Recommendations for students considering Honors Level and Advanced Placement (AP) classes

 

Students who take Honors Level classes should fit the following profile in order to ensure success in these classes:

 

PERFORMANCE

 

The student:

  • Consistently strives to meet high academic standards
  • Demonstrates ability in abstract reasoning
  • Possesses broad general knowledge
  • Respects deadlines
  • Puts forth "best effort", not just "good enough" effort
  • Demonstrates probing curiosity
  • Acts with maturity in the classroom
  • Participates actively in class discussion
  • Demonstrates pride in work submitted
  • Uses textbooks generally above the grade level
  • Participates in extracurricular academic activities

ATTITUDE

 

The student:

  • Assumes responsibility for own learning
  • Possesses a strong work ethic
  • Expects at least one hour of nightly homework in each honors class
  • Comes to class prepared to work
  • Seeks opportunities for enrichment
  • Welcomes creative and challenging assignments
  • Where applicable, suggests own assignments

 

BEHAVIOR

 

The student:

  • Uses class time wisely
  • Respects classmates and teacher
  • Demonstrates personal integrity

 

ATTENDANCE

 

The student:

  • Seldom misses class
  • Arrives punctually
  • Completes make-up work immediately

 

Generally speaking, students who sign up for honors classes should meet the following criteria in the appropriate subject area in grades 9-11:

 

  • Students should be scoring at the Proficient or Advanced level on the PSSA tests
  • Students should be earning a minimum of a "B" letter grade in the appropriate grade 8 class
  • Students should have a teacher recommendation.

 

Students should not sign up for honors classes with the idea of dropping the class if they cannot earn the grade they want or find the class too difficult. Signing up for these classes is a yearlong commitment by both the student and parents.

 

Regular Courses

 

Regular courses are those that are not honors or basic courses.  Regular courses are suited to average and above average students.  All specifically designated required courses are considered regular courses.

Special Programs

 

ESOL

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) is a program designed for students of high school age for whom English is not the primary language.  The program, aligned with the Pennsylvania Department of Education curriculum, serves students from multiple countries with 22 world languages represented in a rigorous and dynamic learning environment. The program facilitates English language proficiency through strengthening the communication skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing and fosters the acquisition of academic literacy while ensuring meaningful student participation in the general program of instruction. Benefits of the ESOL program include increased academic achievement, growth of personal self-confidence, increased resources and learning opportunities for both students and school staff, enhanced academic and personal confidence and self-concept, and the assistance of student integration into culture and society.  Please call  Dr. Anchalee  Sybrandy, ESOL Coordinator/Teacher  for more information at 215-335-5653, ext. 2050.

Mentally Gifted Program

Lincoln's Mentally Gifted program objectives are to provide enrichment to students in career, curricular, social, and cultural endeavors. 

 

Special Education

Abraham Lincoln High School offers a variety of programs for the exceptional student.  A full range of state approved courses are available for the mildly handicapped student.  Special Education is also available for the severely and moderately impaired children where instruction is based on the Life Skills Model program.  A full range of itinerant services is available to ensure that all exceptional students maximize their educational experience, including vision, hearing, speech, occupational and physical therapy, behavior shaping, counseling, and career development.  The educational goal for all special education students is to ensure that all students leave Lincoln High School with the skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary to gain and maintain employment and/or to continue their education or training to the fullest extent possible. 

 

When and wherever possible, Lincoln students are included in regular education classes.  Special Education teachers are assigned to support included students and the regular education teacher within the class.  The IEP team develops all individual programs in accordance with State and Federal guidelines.  All special education placements at Lincoln High are made through the High School Academic Area Office.  For more details, contact Ms. Jordan,  Chairperson for Special Education at 215-335-5653, extension XXXX.

 

Terms and Definitions

Advanced Placement (AP): These classes are designed to allow students to take a college placement exam in order to obtain college credit in the subject area.

Elective: A course not required to be taken for graduation, but one a student may get credit for toward graduation.

Honors: All classes with Honors included in their titles are advanced in nature and material, and are highly recommended for gifted, motivated and college-bound students. Honors classes are recommended for Advanced Placement (AP) preparation.

Independent Study - when a course that is part of the Sandpoint High School curriculum is taken under the supervision of a teacher outside the scheduled class time.

Prerequisite: Conditions a student will have met before being eligible to take a course.

Regular: A class designed for students to meet their graduation competencies in a given area.

Required: A class students must successfully complete for graduation.

Special Education: Resource courses are available for students who qualify for special classes. The State of Pennsylvania determines the guidelines for this program.

Strategic or Basic: A class in required subjects for students with lower reading ability or other learning challenges. These classes will be designated with the letter "S" or "B."

Core Courses           

The school District mandates a body of core-curricular courses in English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Science. Abraham Lincoln follows the Standardized curriculum for each core course as proscribed by the District.


Extra-Curricular

ALHS believes in providing experiences outside the classroom. Students may participate in many activities beyond their coursework. Besides sports, there are numerous clubs, and activities to fit student interests. These may change from year to year. Here is a listing of our current activities

 


Sports


Badminton (Girls V)

Baseball (Boys V & JV)

Basketball (Boys & Girls V & JV)

Bowling

Cheerleading (V)

Field Hockey (Girls V & JV)

Football (Boys V & JV)

Golf (Coed V)

Soccer (Boys V & JV)

Softball (Girls V)

Swimming (Coed V)

Tennis (Boys & Girls V)

Track & Field (Coed V)

Volleyball (Boys & Girls V)

Wrestling (V)

 


 

Clubs


Art

Environmental

Journalism

Video

Chess 

 

CHECK FOR COMPLETE LISTING OF ACTIVITIES


Course Descriptions

English

 

Course
Length

Credit

Name of course

Level

Computer Code

9

10

11

12

Prerequisite

Year

1

English 1

R/H

 

X

X

X

X

 

Year

1

English 2

R/H

 

 

X

X

X

 

Year

1

English 3

R/H

 

 

 

X

X

 

Year

1

English 4

R/H

 

 

 

 

X

 

Year

1

Drama

R

 

 

 

 

X

 

Year

1

Journalism

R

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

English 1
Text: Holt - Elements of Literature: Third Course                         5pds/week/ full year
The English 1 course is designed to help students adjust to the rigors of high school academics.  This course is structured to improve reading, writing, speaking, listening, and vocabulary skills.  The materials include authors representing a wide range of cultures and time periods.  The course complies with the School District of Philadelphia's Core Curriculum and supplements the Core Curriculum with other valuable literary pieces including The Odyssey, Of Mice and Men, and Romeo and Juliet

 

English 2
Text: Holt - Elements of Literature: Fourth Course                       5pds/week/ full year

English 2 is a 10th grade Core Curriculum course.  Students build on prior skills from the previous year's course and gain enhanced knowledge and practice of advanced reading and writing skills.    Although the literary text serves as a basis for coursework, it is supplemented with novels and plays such as To Kill A Mockingbird, Lord of the Flies, Julius Caesar, in conjunction with assorted essays and poems.  Students conduct an independent research project and write independent persuasive, analytical and personal essays.

 

English 3
Text: Holt - Elements of Literature, Fifth Course                            5pds/week/ full year
English 3 is an 11th grade Core Curriculum class prescribed by the School District of Philadelphia which also includes additional reading material chosen to enhance the curriculum. Independent reading is also a key element in this course. Students select their own materials and, upon received teacher approval, track their progress in their reading logs. The study of American Literature and challenging writing assignments in the informational, narrative, and persuasive modes prepare students for the PSAT, SAT and college. There is an emphasis on critical thinking skills, grammar and mechanics, close textual analysis, and broad independent reading. Texts include The Crucible by Arthur Miller,  Vocabulary Workshop , Black Voices: An Anthology of African American Literature, and Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger.

 

English 4
Text: Holt - Elements of Literature, Sixth Course                           5pds/week/ full year
Grade 12 English is an overview of British and World Literature.  Students study fiction, nonfiction, autobiography, poetry, drama, and speeches. Essay writing is reinforced and applied to the study of literature. English 4 continue to expand the reading and writing skills developed at earlier stages of the English sequence. The literature curriculum is diverse and extensive, as it follows the School District of Philadelphia's Core Curriculum.  Students read and analyze challenging works, including Hamlet, 1984 and Cry Beloved Country.

 

AP English Literature
Text: Bedford - Title: The Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing               5pds/week/ full year
Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition is a college level course that engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure, and illuminate the human condition. Students will consider a work's structure, style, and themes as well as the literary elements of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. In addition, writing is an essential part of AP English Literature with assignments that focus on the critical anaylsis of literature and include expository, analytical, and argumentative discourse.

 

Drama
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year                                                              Humanities
The curriculum for the drama class incorporates reading plays and acting out the parts.  Acting skills are learned through playing games and improvisation.  This course helps build self-esteem and helps students strengthen their creative talents.  It also improve reading skills and enables students to better understand characterization through analyzing characters and acting out parts.  Students will learn to express themselves using their voice, facial expression and body.  Plays and films are used.  The plays incorporated are King Hedley, The Piano, and The Glass Menagerie.   This is a hands-on class with total student involvement.

 

Journalism
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
Journalism is a college preparatory course where students are introduced to the basic elements of journalism, emphasizing interviewing and writing for print, mastery of the Associated Press style, and an introduction to such issues as objectivity, critical thinking, ethics, and libel concerns.  Other areas covered include newspaper layout and design, writing for broadcast, and source evaluation.  This class helps prepare students for an introductory college level journalism course.

 

Yearbook
Text: Publisher - None                         5pds/week/ full year

 

Math

 

Course
Length

Credit

Name of course

Level

Computer Code

9

10

11

12

Prerequisite

Year

1

Algebra 1

R/H

 

X

X

X

X

 

Year

1

Geometry

R/H

 

 

X

X

X

 

Year

1

Algebra 2

R/H

 

 

 

X

X

 

Year

1

Discreet Mathematics

R

 

 

 

 

X

 

Year

1

Elementary Functions

R/H

 

 

 

 

X

 

Year

1

AP Calculus

AP

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year

1

Statistics

R

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Algebra I
Text: Holt - Algebra 1                           5pds/week/ full year
                  This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply mathematical skills to real life situations and to increase their computational fluency. They will refine their mathematical skills while exploring real life applications.

 

Algebra II
Text: Holt - Algebra 2                           5pds/week/ full year
                  This course is designed for the student who has successfully completed Algebra I and Geometry. Algebra II allows students to recognize, represent and solve real life problems involving relationships among variable quantities. They will engage in solving problems using equations and graphs to describe variable relationships. Throughout the course, students will engage in applications, real-world connections, communications, problem solving and reasoning. We also offer Honors Algebra II.

 

AP Calculus
Text: Houghton Mifflin - Calculus of a single variable                                 5pds/week/ full year
                  This course is designed for the college-bound student who has successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry, & Algebra II. Calculus allows the student to develop a solid foundation of advanced mathematics. This course will also prepare the students to take the AP Calculus exam. Students will develop their mathematical power through modeling, technology, cooperative learning, projects, critical thinking, writing and connecting mathematics to the real world.

 

Elementary Functions (Pre-Calculus)
Text: Pearson - Precalculus                                5pds/week/ full year
                  This course is designed for the college-bound student who has successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry, & Algebra II. Elementary Functions allows the student to develop a solid foundation of advanced mathematics. Students will develop their mathematical power through modeling, technology, cooperative learning, projects, critical thinking, writing and connecting mathematics to the real world.

 

Discrete Mathematics
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  This course is designed for the 12th. grade student who has successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry, & Algebra II. Discrete Mathematics challenges the students that are not interested in pursuing advanced mathematics courses while providing them with a basic understanding of what a citizen needs to make informed decisions in the real world.

 

Geometry
Text: Key Curriculum Press - Geometry                         5pds/week/ full year
                  This course is designed for the student who has successfully completed Algebra I.  Geometry provides a bridge between spatial relationships and algebraic expressions. The student will study points, lines, rays, segments, planes, angles, circles and polygons as well as their relationship to each other. They will learn to use  geometric tools and theories to solve real life problems. We also offer Honors Geometry.

 

Statistics
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  This course is designed to exemplify how statistics is used to picture and describe the world. There is a focus on data and statistical reasoning while fostering active learning.  Students will learn the course concepts through hands-on experimentation and investigation. They will analyze existing data as well as data collected through a survey, observational study or experiment. They will then display the data in different ways, analyze it, and draw conclusions based on the results. The four main components of the course are: exploring data, data collection, probability, and inference.  Successful completion of this course will prepare students for statistics courses at the undergraduate level.

 

Social Studies

Course
Length

Credit

Name of course

Level

Computer Code

9

10

11

12

Prerequisite

Year

1

African American History

H/R

 

X

X

X

X

none

Year

1

World History

R

 

 

X

X

X

AAH

Year

1

American History

R

 

 

 

X

X

WH

Year

1

Social Science

R

 

 

 

 

X

AH

Year

1

AP United States History

AP

 

 

 

X

X

Tchr. Rec.

Year

1

AP Psychology

AP

 

 

 

X

X

Tchr. Rec.

Year

1

AP Government

AP

 

 

 

X

X

Tchr. Rec.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Social Studies department provides four of the courses required for graduation by the School District: World History, American History, Social Science and African American History as well as, an elective course in AP Psychology. 

 

AP Psychology
Text:                                                             5pds/week/ full year
The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and

scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other

animals . Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena

associated with each of the major subfields within psychology . They also learn about

the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

 

World History
Text: McDougall-Litell - World History: Patterns of Interaction                      5pds/week/ full year
World History is a Core Curriculum survey course designed to familiarize ninth grade students with the chronology of the major civilizations on the five continents from early times to the modern age. The course enables students to understand the factors that influence the character of emerging societies and to appreciate the role of geography, religion, literacy and the arts in the life cycles of various early and contemporary societies. Students engage in hands-on projects and in independent research leading to written reports and oral presentations. Benchmark assessment takes the form of document-based essays, which are assessed at the school level.  Text:

 

American History
Text: McDougall-Littell - Title         The Americans                      5pds/week/ full year
American History is a Core Curriculum course that traces the political, social and economic forces that have influenced American society from the 1600's to the present. The topics covered include the colonial period and Revolutionary War, the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution, Expansionism, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the political and social problems of the Industrial Age, the U. S. as a world power, prosperity and the Great Depression, the politics and economics of World War II and the subsequent peace, and post-war America in a turbulent world (1964-present). Independent research and writing are important elements in the learning and assessment processes. Benchmark assessment takes the form of document-based essays, which are assessed at the school level.

 

Social Science
Text: Publisher - Title       Civics, Government and Economics in Action.             5pds/week/ full year
Social Science is the twelfth grade Core Curriculum course in the Social Studies sequence. During the first semester the topics studied include the foundations of our government, the reasons for rules and laws, elections, the development and function of political parties, the functions of the three branches of government, and the role of government in our lives on the personal local, state, national and global levels. In the second semester the course focuses on economics through the study of economic systems, personal finance, the government's role in the U.S. economy, money, banking and the stock market. Students have the opportunity for active learning about investment through participation in the popular simulation, The Stock Market Game.

 

AP United States History
Text: Publisher - Title       The American Pageant, 13th ed.    5pds/week/ full year
During the year-long college-level Advanced Placement United States History course, students

will study the history of the area now called the United States.  Beginning with a brief

examination of pre-Colombian events, the course concentrates on developments from the

colonial period to the present.  The study includes primary and secondary sources and requires

students to develop critical thinking skills as they interpret historical events and controversies. 

The focus of AP US History is to train students in the essential skills of critical reading and

analytic writing, which will enable them to succeed not only on the AP exam (prepared by the

College Board) given in May, but also in a variety of post secondary courses. Additional time for

learning is provided for the students by linking the course to an instructional advisory period. A

variety of texts are used in addition to the The American Pageant, 13th ed.

 

AP Government
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
During the year-long college-level Advanced Placement United States History course, students

will study the history of the area now called the United States.  Beginning with a brief

examination of pre-Colombian events, the course concentrates on developments from the

colonial period to the present.  The study includes primary and secondary sources and requires

students to develop critical thinking skills as they interpret historical events and controversies. 

The focus of AP US History is to train students in the essential skills of critical reading and

analytic writing, which will enable them to succeed not only on the AP exam (prepared by the

College Board) given in May, but also in a variety of post secondary courses. Additional time for

learning is provided for the students by linking the course to an instructional advisory period. A

variety of texts are used in addition to the The American Pageant, 13th ed.

 

African-American History/Honors African-American History
Text: Publisher - Globe     Title        The African American Experience                  5pds/week/ full year
African American History is a Core Curriculum course designed to meet the needs of minority students of African descent to 1) understand and appreciate their African origins and 2) trace the history of their forefathers' enslavement, liberation and on-going struggle for equality in the United States. It is a mandatory elective for all 10th grade students. The course provides students of all ethnicities an opportunity to explore ancient African civilizations, the slave trade, the role of African Americans (both enslaved and free) in the growth of our nation, the anti-slavery movement, the Civil War and Reconstruction, decades of cultural achievement despite continued repression and the Civil Right Movement, including legislative and judicial landmarks. Students will engage in independent reading and research regarding the lives of prominent African American leaders. This course features a strong emphasis on the use of authentic research and primary sources, project-based and collaborative learning.

 

Science

The science department offers required core-courses and elective courses that prepare students for post-secondary education or direct entry into the workforce. The science department provides for a variety of science related extra-curricular activities to enhance the students' science experience at ALHS.

 

Course
Length

Credit

Name of course

Level

Computer Code

9

10

11

12

Prerequisite

Year

1

General Physical Science

R

 

X

X

X

X

 

Year

1

Biology

R/H

 

 

X

X

X

 

Year

1

Chemistry

R/H/AP

 

 

 

X

X

 

Year

1

Physics

R

 

 

 

 

X

 

Year

1

Earth Science

R

 

 

 

 

X

 

Year

1

Environmental Science

AP

 

 

 

 

X

 

Year

1

Contemporary Issues in Science

R

 

 

 

 

X

 

General Physical Science
Text: Holt - Physical Science                               5pds/week
A 9th grade Core Curriculum course, which provides and introduction to the concepts in chemistry and physics. Successful completion of the course provides a foundation for later success in Chemistry and Physics.

 

Biology
Text: Holt - Biology                               5pds/week

A 10th grade Core Curriculum course that applies the scientific method to the study of living things. Biology introduces the fundamental properties of living things, cell structure and function, heredity, evolution, and the impact of environmental factors on living things. Classes typically involve demonstrations, lab exercises, use of microscopes and simulations.

 

Chemistry
Text: Holt - Chemistry                          5pds/week
A 11th grade Core Curriculum course that provides students with the fundamental understandings of the structure and properties of matter, the nature and forms of energy and its relationship to matter. Topics covered in chemistry include matter, energy, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonds, nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoiciometry, gases, intermolecular forces, properties of solutions, equilibrium, chemical kinetics, acids and bases.  Chemistry places an emphasis on laboratory experience.

 

AP Chemistry
Text: CHEMISTRY, by Zumdahl & Zumdahl, 8th edition.        5 pds./week
In keeping with the objectives of the College Board, students enrolled in AP Chemistry will cover content equivalent to what is presented in two semesters of college general chemistry. Upon successful completion of this course and achievement of a satisfactory score on the AP Chemistry Examination, students may have the opportunity to receive general chemistry credits or place out of general chemistry classes and move into more advanced science courses during their first years in college.

 

Physics
Text: Holt - Physics                               5pds/week
Physics is an elective course for 12th grade students. Physics follows the School District of Philadelphia's Core Curriculum for Physics. Students will gain an understanding of the principles governing light, sound, motion, force, energy, magnetism, electricity and the mechanics of solids. Students interested in careers in science, mathematics, engineering or medicine are strongly encouraged to take Physics.

 

Contemporatry Science
Text: Publisher - Name                      5pds/week
                  This advanced course on the study of Earth and its modern issues is for a student who enjoys biological and earth sciences and is in need of fulfilling their science requirement.  The student will study a wide array of topics, such as, the water cycle, rock cycle, fossils, geological time scale, plate tectonics, solar system, stars, and the universe.  This will be accomplished by laboratory activities, current events, the Internet, and other computer related activities.   The student will gain an interest in Earth Science and Space Science so that they may continue further study in a community college or a more advanced 4-year program.

 

World Language

 

Current languages taught at Abraham Lincoln High School are Spanish, French, and Latin.

 

Level 1
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
An introduction of the target language aligned with the national standards. The emphasis throughout the program is on the development of language for communication. This includes an understanding of the phonetics of the language and the linguistic forms. The basic skills of foreign language learning are: listening and understanding, speaking, reading and writing. The goals and expectations are clearly defined and identified in the planning and scheduling timeline - Level 1.  The content performance descriptors are outcomes-based to assure that students are able to function in "real-life" situations. Level 1 is the foundation of World Language study. Vocabulary, grammar, idiomatic expressions, and culture are introduced, continually spiraled and enhanced.

 

Level 2
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
Continued emphasis on communication.  Students have been introduced to the functional vocabulary, idioms, structure, and culture in Level 1. Level 2 builds upon this foundation and enhances these concepts in a manner that is appropriate for grade, age and level of development of the students. The planning and scheduling timeline for Level 2 is designed to meet these goals and expectations. The basic skills of foreign language learning are further developed with students able to listen to and understand more complex language; speak in the target language with more confidence; read simple articles about topics of interest to them; and write notes, short letters, invitations and paragraphs. Students should begin doing group and/or individual projects of varying types. Students also learn more about the culture, history, and geography of the countries in which the target language is spoken as well as the connections of that culture to their own.

 


Academy Program Courses

Ninth Grade Academy

 

Horticulture Academy

 

                  The Horticulture Academy at Abraham Lincoln High School is a three-year technical program that provides specialized instruction, laboratory training, and field experience in the greens industry.  The program prepares students for careers in floral design and retail flower shop operations and management, landscape design, implementation, and maintenance, arboriculture, interior plantscaping, and greenhouse crop production.  The curriculum combines class work with practical experience in the school's brand new 2600 square foot greenhouse, fully operational student run retail flower shop, and three enclosed courtyards.  The Horticulture Academy has also been a major exhibitor in the worlds largest international indoor flower show, The Philadelphia Flower Show, for the past thirty-three consecutive years.  The Philadelphia Flower Show gives all students in the Horticulture Academy the opportunity to participate in the exhibit and attend the flower show.  Along with the classroom curriculum, after school job placement and summer employment opportunities helps develop skills needed for post-high school employment or higher education placement.  The Horticulture Academy bridges the gap between theory and practice.

 

Greenhouse Crop Production
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  The Greenhouse Crop Production class teaches students the business of growing plants and operating the brand new state of the art 2600 square foot greenhouse.  Students are responsible for growing interior plants for sales, and the marketing and selling of greenhouse crops along with growing, marketing and selling of bedding plants, poinsettias, and other seasonal crops.  As a major exhibitor in the Philadelphia Flower Show every February/March, our exhibit must include plants, which the greenhouse students learn how to grow and force to bloom out of season. 

 

Retail Flower Shop Management/Interior Plantscaping

Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  The Retail Flower Shop Management course gives students the opportunity to learn and experience running a business in the student run full scale retail flower shop.  Students are taught the design aspect of the business including designing arrangements, pricing, ordering from wholesale market, dealing with customers, completing the sales slip, and marketing products throughout the school year and specific seasons.  Hands on experience and computer usage for record keeping is an integral part of the curriculum.   Integrated into the curriculum is Interior Plantscaping.  Students are trained as interior plantscaping technicians.  The students learn the design, installation, and maintenance of interior plants in varying interior environments and the effect it has on the people and the interior environment.

 

Landscape Design, Implementation, Maintenance and Arboriculture
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  Students learn the skill of designing a landscape, implementing the plan, and maintaining the plants in the landscape.  The students use and maintain landscape tools and equipment including power lawn mowers, edgers, blowers, rope and tree climbing equipment and hand tools. The hands on experiences take place in the 3 enclosed courtyards and other landscaped areas on the school grounds.

 


Environmental Academy

 

There's one earth and it's home to 7 billion people.  The Environmental Academy is dedicated to educating students to be stewards of the planet.  The U. S. and especially Philadelphia is entering the "Green Revolution." Learn about the newest "Green Technologies" and get in on the ground floor of this new, exciting economy by being part of the Environmental Academy.

 

As a graduate of the Environmental Sciences Academy, a student will be able to . . . .

 

Be an ambassador for the environment-Build upon relevant experiences in Conservation of built and natural (community) environment. (Internship projects), Learn to use and maintain resources responsibly. Learn to live Sustainably, Plan for entering workforce, college etc.  Pay it forward-leave a legacy! Environmental Academy Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, Philadelphia Water Works Interpretive Center, PECO-Exelon Trip, Cape May Estuary Trip, Numerous College visits, Many guest lecturers and more!

 

Environmental Technology Academy offers a three year consecutive environmental education, Going Green I, II, III, and advanced 12th grade AP Environmental Science.

 

Going Green I-10th Grade-Introduction to Environmental Sciences-
Text: Holt-Environmental Science                                                      5pds/week/full year

                  Students will be introduced to the study of Environmental Sciences exploring topics such as: Dynamic Earth, Organization of Life, Biodiversity, Ecosystems and How they Work, Populations Interactions and Biodiversity. Studies are conducted on school grounds and surrounding Pennypack Park.  Students my be placed in internships as they become available.

 

Going Green II 11th Grade- Natural Resources

Text: Holt-Environmental Science                                      5pds/week/full year

Students in the 2nd year of ETA will examine how we can Conserve and Protect our Natural Resources through Labs designed to enhance problem solving and critical thinking skills.   We will explore the impact of Human Population on the Planet. Topics included, Watersheds, Water, Air and Soil Pollution.  Noise and Light Pollution. Climate and Climate Change, Land Management and Conservation, Feeding the World, Crops and Soil, Energy Resources, Minerals and Mineral Resources, Solid Waste.

 

Going Green III-12th Grade-Environmental Activism
Text: Holt-Environmental Science                                      5pds/week/full year

Students enrolled in the 3rd year ETA course will use their knowledge of Environmental Sciences and help solve our Environmental Problems by taking an active role.  Senior Projects are designed and implemented during this class.  Individual Projects are researched and executed as part of the Senior Exit Project.

 

This course appears both in the Science course section and the Environmental Science Academy Section.

 

AP Environmental Science -12th Grade
Text:  Miller - Living in the Environment                         5pds/week/full year

Students in this college level course are challenged to understand the Human Impact on the Earth.  Sustainability is explored by working on real life environmental problems in an urban setting.  Students will participate in labs designed to emphasize problem solving and critical thinking skills.  Using the school grounds and Pennypack Park student will conduct field studies which include, ecological relationships, population ecology and principals, analysis of soil, water and air.  Emphasis is on preparation for the AP Exam given in May.

 


Business Academy

 

The Business Academy provides personalized rostering for all Business students in grades 9-12. The goal of this Academy is to increase students' success while in high school by enabling them to acquire the qualifications needed to succeed in entry-level business positions or in post-secondary study.

All business students are eligible to become a member of Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) and participate in the regional, state, and national competitive events.

 

Accounting & Finance 1. 2. 3
Text: Publisher - Title                         10 pds/week/ full year
                   The Accounting CTE Program is a three year track designed to prepare students as accounting clerks, credit clerks, payroll clerks, statistical clerks, general bookkeepers, bank clerks/tellers, auditing clerks, billing machine operators and inventory clerks. These positions provide technical administrative support to professional accountants and other financial management personnel. Students learn to use generally accepted accounting principles in manual and computerized formats to complete the steps of the accounting cycle for various forms of business ownership.. Students also receive instruction in business ethics, business law, entrepreneurship, economics, office procedures and public relations. Students are provided experiences and instruction needed to satisfy initial employment requirements for accounting, computing and data capturing occupations.

The Accounting CTE Program prepares students for the Accounting-Basic NOCTI exam and the Microsoft Office Specialist industry certification. These exams are administered in the 3rd year of the student's program of study.

 

Business Technology Levels 1, 2, 3
Text: Publisher - Title                         10 pds/week/ full year
                  The Business Technology CTE Program is a 3-year track designed to prepare students to perform the duties of administrative assistants and/or secretaries and related occupations. Students compose, format, and process business correspondence. Students also receive instruction in business ethics, principles of business law, entrepreneurship, office procedures, public relations and accounting. Students are provided the experiences and instruction needed to satisfy entry-level employment requirements for corresponding, legal, medical, educational and technical secretaries; or in related areas such as general office clerk, clerk-typist, word processors, information clerks and records management clerks. Secretaries and administrative assistants generally advance to administrative positions with higher pay and more responsibilities after completing a post-secondary education program in business administration.

The Business Technology CTE Program prepares students for the Administrative Assisting NOCTI exam and the Microsoft Office Specialist industry certification. These exams are administered in the 3rd year of the student's program of study.

 

Computer Applications 1
Text: Publisher - Title                         5 pds/week/ full year

                  This course is designed to teach students basic keyboarding skills consisting of fluent manipulation of letter, figure, and symbol keys by touch. Emphasis is placed on creating and editing business documents using Microsoft Word. Students also learn how to create and deliver business presentations using PowerPoint. Internet, email, and research skills are also introduced in this course. Oral and written communication skills are reinforced throughout the course as students learn to deliver presentations as well as compose, format, and proofread business documents. Simulations, projects, and teamwork provide opportunities for application of instructional competencies. This course provides hands on training using a learn, practice, reinforce, and assess method of skill building.  (Recommended for students in Grades 10-12)

 

Computer Applications 2
Text: Publisher - Title                         5 pds/week/ full year

This course is designed to teach advanced word processing, database, and spreadsheet skills. Emphasis is placed on the integration of Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint applications. Ethical issues pertaining to information systems and information technologies are also emphasized. Communication skills and critical thinking are reinforced throughout the course.  Prerequisite: Must have passed Computer Applications I  (Recommended for students in Grades 10-12)

 

Entrepreneurship
Text: Publisher - Title                         5 pds/week/ half year or full year

The Business Small Learning Community has partnered with the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) to offer students a world-class curriculum in Entrepreneurship. Students learn about the rewards and risks of starting their own business. This course is offered as an elective to all students in the 11th and 12th grade. Lessons include the concepts of competitive advantage, ownership, opportunity recognition, marketing, finance, and product development. Each student comes up with an idea for a business and works throughout the course to prepare a business plan, which they present and defend to a panel of judges in a classroom competition. The winners of the classroom competition go on to compete in citywide or regional competitions with the hopes of reaching the annual national competition held in New York City.

 

Personal Finance
Text: Publisher - Title                         5 pds/week/ half year or full year

This course focuses on personal finance skills that are relevant to the lives of teens and young adults. Students learn strategies for managing their own money and becoming financially responsible individuals. The specific topics addressed in this course are: setting financial goals, credit and money management, investing, banking and financial services, and insurance. (Recommended for students in Grades 11-12)

Health & Life Sciences Academy

 

Academic coursework enhanced by hands-on career exploration in the field of health and human development. Private corporations supply students with service sites where they can gain substantial career experience in health related professions while earning high school credit during the regular school day.

 

Anatomy and Physiology
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  Students investigate the structure and function of the human body including: a comparison of the anatomical structures and physiological functions of human systems, integration of the body's reproduction, growth, and development processes, relation of the body's energy needs to its energy supplying processes, maintenance of homeostasis within the body while responding to internal and external forces, and environmental factors that affect the human body.

 

Laboratory Assistant 1, 2, 3
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  This course introduces students to the skills necessary in becoming a lab assistant.  Skills  examined will be the students' able to perform routine clinical laboratory tests making specimen oriented decisions on predetermined criteria, including a working knowledge of critical values. Communications skills extend to interactions with members of the healthcare team, external relations, customer service and patient education. Students will also be responsibilities for information processing, training, and quality control monitoring wherever clinical laboratory testing is performed.

 

Medical Assistant 1, 2, 3
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  This course introduces students to the skills necessary in becoming a lab assistant.

                  Medical assistants work primarily in medical clinics, physician offices or ambulatory care clinics. The medical assistant is trained in all aspects of the medical office. Responsibilities might include preparing the patient for physical examination, obtaining a health history, assisting the physician with the exam as well as assisting with minor surgery, performing routine tests independently, and disinfecting and sterilizing instruments. Some medical assistants manage the office, arrange and confirm appointments, register patients, keep treatment records, send bills, receive payments, file insurance forms, handle the mail, and keep inventory records.

 

Law & Public Administration Academy

 

The Law Academy will provide students with a strong academic background while introducing them to careers in the fields of law, criminal justice, public and private security as well as city, state and federal civil service. The goal of our program is to ensure that every student has the opportunity to reach his/her maximum potential academically while maturing socially and emotionally. We prepare students for a successful transition to a post-secondary opportunity.

 

Contemporary Issues (Mediation)
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  This course teaches students nonviolent forms of conflict resolution and examines issues facing the modern day American. We cover a wide range of topics including mediation processes and current events. Students are taught to examine conflicts in today's' world while trying to find ways to nonviolently solve them.

 

Criminology
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  This course will investigate various aspects of the U.S. Criminal Justice System of today and tomorrow. Students will contrast the constitutional and procedural rights of individuals with the need for public order and personal safety. They will explore the role of technology as it helps in the fight against crime while simultaneously providing new criminal opportunities for high-technology offenders. Students will examine the challenge of multiculturalism and diversity as they contribute to the complex social and cultural framework within which the criminal justice system must operate.

 

Constitutional Law (Court Procedures)
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ full year
                  This course will study the U.S. legal system while providing practical information and problem-solving opportunities that develop in students the knowledge and skills necessary for survival in our law-saturated society. The curriculum includes case studies, mock trials, role-plays, small group exercises and visual analysis activities. Students will learn substantive information about law, democracy and human rights through strategies that promote problem solving, critical thinking, cooperative learning, improved communication and conflict resolution skills and the ability to participate effectively in society.

 

Fine and Performing Arts Academy

 

The Arts Academy is a small learning community, which focuses on the creative and performing arts. This strong academic program prepares students for entry into artistic careers and post secondary schools. The Arts Academy provides students with a background in music theory, basic design, and theater skills.

 

Art 1, 2, 3
Text: Publisher - Title                         5pds/week/ half year/whole year
                  Open to all students interested in art for enjoyment as a hobby or as a possible career. A sampling of all areas of art will be introduced to the student and explored by them. This course further explores all aspects of art toward a future career or as a hobby for enjoyment. In Art 2, emphasis will be put on focusing the student upon a specific career in art or exploring art methods and materials for enjoyment.  Art 3 covers advanced aspects of drawing, painting, color design, graphics, sculpture, and commercial art. Students whose goal is art school will concentrate on portfolio preparation. Other students will explore art methods and materials for enjoyment.

 

Instrumental
Text: Various                                    5pds/week/ full year
This course is for students who wish to participate in Lincoln's band and orchestra program.  The group performs regularly throughout the school year.  This course is open by teacher approval only.

 

Music 1

Text: Glencoe - Music!  Its Role and Importance in our Lives                   5 pds/week/ half year/whole year

This is a non-performance course in basic musicianship and appreciation.  Students will cover basic music history, music theory, and the history of popular music and jazz.  Students will utilize some aspects of music technology.  Open enrollment.

 

Vocal (Varsity Singers)

Text: Various                                                                                                                                      5pds/week/ full year

This course is for students who wish to participate in Lincoln Varsity Singers.  The group performs regularly throughout the school year. This course is open by teacher approval only.

 

Music Theory

Text:  McGraw-Hill - Music in Theory and Practice                                                         5 pds/week/half year

This course is for students to learn musicianship and structure of music.  Open enrollment.

 

Music Technology

Text:  Various                                                                                                                                     5 pds/week/half year

This course is for students to learn various components of music technology including recording, production, composition, note engraving, etc.  Open enrollment.

 

Art
Text:  Various                                                                                                                   5 pds/week/half year/whole year
                  Techniques and skills involved in painting, drawing and color theory. A lab fee is required to cover the cost of materials for this course.

 

Deaf & Hard of Hearing Academy

 

American Sign Language 1
Text: Terrance J. - A basic course in American Sign Language                                     5pds/week/ full year
                  ASL 1 offers an opportunity to develop basic communication skill. Right away, students can communicate, meaningfully, in a new language and engage in real conversations with Deaf and Hard-of-hearing friends and classmates.

Leave your voice at home! This class follows an immersion approach.

                  Typical class activities include learning new signs, creating sentences, rehearsing dialogues and translating ASL to written English. You will learn about ASL, Deaf people and Deaf culture by watching feature movies and documentaries, listening to guest speakers and discussing newspaper articles and magazine stories.  You will write reviews of Deaf culture books and prepare a research project. You will be informed about community activities where you could use ASL skills. Students will strengthen their understanding if English grammar by comparing it to the grammar of ASL.

 

American Sign Language 2
Text: Terrance J. - A basic course in American Sign Language                                     5pds/week/ full year
                  ASL 2 enhances second language knowledge through continued experience of the immersion approach; you will be expected to sign, not voice, during instruction time. Students will expand upon basic lexical and grammatical skills introduced in ASL 1 through textbook exercises, dialogues, and by dictation and translation. In addition, there will be many opportunities to examine the history and culture of Deaf people in greater depth as well as the role and training of ASL interpreters through presentations, documentary movies and readings beyond the textbook.

                  Refining your ability to use a second language will make you a better student abd a sought-after employee. Examining ASL grammar and completing writing assignments will improve your English writing and reading skills. Second language students strengthen their abilities to think creatively, communicate and collaborate more effectively and bring cultural understanding and global awareness to the workplace.

 

~~

While every attempt has been made to represent the course offerings, programs and requirements accurately in this booklet, it must be acknowledged that policy changes and staffing may supersede what is represented on these pages. Based on student requests and/or staffing some course offerings may have to be dropped or modified.

 

STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION - The School District of Philadelphia, an equal opportunity employer, will not discriminate in employment or education programs or activities, based on race, color, religion, age, national origin, ancestry, physical handicap, gender, sexual orientation, union membership or limited English proficiency. This policy of non-discrimination extends to all other legally protected classifications. Publication of this policy in this document is in accordance with state and federal laws including Title IX of the educational amendment of 1972 and sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Inquiries should be directed to Sterlin C. Daniel, Equal Opportunity Compliance Officer, 734 Schuylkill Avenue, 1st floor, Philadelphia, PA 19146, (215) 875-3815.